George Santayana Quotes

Fashion is something barbarous, for it produces innovation without reason and imitation without benefit.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 7, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
The spirit's foe in man has not been simplicity, but sophistication.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 11, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
The hunger for facile wisdom is the root of all false philosophy.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, essayist. Originally published 1905. Reason in Religion, ch. 2, Scribner's (1945).
It is easier to make a saint out of a libertine than out of a prig.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 11, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
A soul is but the last bubble of a long fermentation in the world.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 10, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
That fear first created the gods is perhaps as true as anything so brief could be on so great a subject.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
The more rational an institution is the less it suffers by making concessions to others.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Science," ch. 9, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
The family is an early expedient and in many ways irrational. If the race had developed a special sexless class to be nurses, pedagogues, and slaves, like the workers among ants and bees, then the family would have been unnecessary. Such a division of labor would doubtless have involved evils of its own, but it would have obviated some drags and vexations proper to the family.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 2, The Life of Reason (1905-1906) rev. edition (1953).
A man's feet must be planted in his country, but his eyes should survey the world.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 7, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
Parents lend children their experience and a vicarious memory; children endow their parents with a vicarious immortality.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 2, The Life of Reason (1905-1906, revised 1953).