George Santayana Quotes

The spirit's foe in man has not been simplicity, but sophistication.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 11, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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The hunger for facile wisdom is the root of all false philosophy.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, essayist. Originally published 1905. Reason in Religion, ch. 2, Scribner's (1945).
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It is easier to make a saint out of a libertine than out of a prig.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 11, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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A soul is but the last bubble of a long fermentation in the world.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 10, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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That fear first created the gods is perhaps as true as anything so brief could be on so great a subject.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Religion," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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... the God to whom depth in philosophy bring back men's minds is far from being the same from whom a little philosophy estranges them.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, essayist. Originally published 1905. Reason in Religion, ch. 1, Scribner's (1945). a comment on Francis Bacon's remark that "a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism."
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The more rational an institution is the less it suffers by making concessions to others.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Science," ch. 9, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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The family is an early expedient and in many ways irrational. If the race had developed a special sexless class to be nurses, pedagogues, and slaves, like the workers among ants and bees, then the family would have been unnecessary. Such a division of labor would doubtless have involved evils of its own, but it would have obviated some drags and vexations proper to the family.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 2, The Life of Reason (1905-1906) rev. edition (1953).
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A man's feet must be planted in his country, but his eyes should survey the world.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 7, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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Parents lend children their experience and a vicarious memory; children endow their parents with a vicarious immortality.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 2, The Life of Reason (1905-1906, revised 1953).
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