George Santayana Quotes

To knock a thing down, especially if it is cocked at an arrogant angle, is a deep delight to the blood.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
Society is like the air, necessary to breathe but insufficient to live on.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 8, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
Wealth, religion, military victory have more rhetorical than efficacious worth.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 2, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
Many possessions, if they do not make a man better, are at least expected to make his children happier; and this pathetic hope is behind many exertions.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
A conception not reducible to the small change of daily experience is like a currency not exchangeable for articles of consumption; it is not a symbol, but a fraud.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 8, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
It takes patience to appreciate domestic bliss; volatile spirits prefer unhappiness.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 2, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
The irrational in the human has something about it altogether repulsive and terrible, as we see in the maniac, the miser, the drunkard or the ape.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
To delight in war is a merit in the soldier, a dangerous quality in the captain, and a positive crime in the statesman.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
My remembrance of the past is a novel I am constantly recomposing; and it would not be a historical novel, but sheer fiction, if the material events which mark and ballast my career had not their public dates and characters scientifically discoverable.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, essayist. Originally published 1923. Skepticism and Animal Faith, chapter 3, Dover Publications (1955).
The theatre, for all its artifices, depicts life in a sense more truly than history, because the medium has a kindred movement to that of real life, though an artificial setting and form.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. Skepticism and the Animal Mind, p. 102.