George Santayana Quotes

To knock a thing down, especially if it is cocked at an arrogant angle, is a deep delight to the blood.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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Society is like the air, necessary to breathe but insufficient to live on.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 8, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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Wealth, religion, military victory have more rhetorical than efficacious worth.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 2, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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Many possessions, if they do not make a man better, are at least expected to make his children happier; and this pathetic hope is behind many exertions.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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A conception not reducible to the small change of daily experience is like a currency not exchangeable for articles of consumption; it is not a symbol, but a fraud.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 8, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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It takes patience to appreciate domestic bliss; volatile spirits prefer unhappiness.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 2, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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The irrational in the human has something about it altogether repulsive and terrible, as we see in the maniac, the miser, the drunkard or the ape.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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To delight in war is a merit in the soldier, a dangerous quality in the captain, and a positive crime in the statesman.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "Reason in Society," ch. 3, The Life of Reason (1905-1906).
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Truth is one of the realities covered in the eclectic religion of our fathers by the idea of God. Awe very properly hangs about it, since it is the immovable standard and silent witness of all our memories and assertions; and the past and the future, which in our anxious life are so differently interesting and so differently dark, are one seamless garment for the truth, shining like the sun.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, essayist. Originally published 1923. Skepticism and Animal Faith, chapter 25, Dover Publications (1955).
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Logic, like language, is partly a free construction and partly a means of symbolizing and harnessing in expression the existing diversities of things; and whilst some languages, given a man's constitution and habits, may seem more beautiful and convenient to him than others, it is a foolish heat in a patriot to insist that only his native language is intelligible or right.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, essayist. Originally published 1923. Skepticism and Animal Faith, preface, Dover Publications (1955).
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