George Santayana Quotes

Perhaps the only true dignity of man is his capacity to despise himself.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. Spinoza's Ethics, introduction (1910).
Oaths are the fossils of piety.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "The Absence of Religion in Shakespeare," issue 5, New World Journal.
He carries his English weather in his heart wherever he goes, and it becomes a cool spot in the desert, and a steady and sane oracle amongst all the delirium of mankind.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "The British Character," Soliloquies in England (1922).
Fun is a good thing but only when it spoils nothing better.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "The Comic," The Sense of Beauty (1896).
Sanity is a madness put to good uses; waking life is a dream controlled.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. repr. In Little Essays, ed. Logan Pearsall Smith (1920). "The Elements of Poetry," Interpretations of Poetry and Religion (1900).
The mind of the Renaissance was not a pilgrim mind, but a sedentary city mind, like that of the ancients.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. The Genteel Tradition at Bay, ch. 1 (1931).
The primary use of conversation is to satisfy the impulse to talk.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. The Last Puritan, p. 385 (1935).
Experience is a mere whiff or rumble, produced by enormously complex and ill-deciphered causes of experience; and in the other direction, experience is a mere peephole through which glimpses come down to us of eternal things.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, essayist. Letter, May 1933, to the Marchesa Iris Origo. The Letters of George Santayana, ed. Daniel Cory (1955).
Happiness is the only sanction of life; where happiness fails, existence remains a mad and lamentable experiment.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. The Life of Reason, "Reason in Common Sense," ch. 10 (1905-1906).
A conceived thing is doubly a product of mind, more a product of mind, if you will, than an idea, since ideas arise, so to speak, by the mind's inertia and conceptions of things by its activity. Ideas are mental sediment; conceived things are mental growths.
George Santayana (1863-1952), Spanish-born U.S. philosopher, poet. The Life of Reason: The Phases of Human Progress, pt. 1, ch. 6, Scribner (1906).