George Santayana Quotes

Language is like money, without which specific relative values may well exist and be felt, but cannot be reduced to a common denominator.
George Santayana (1863-1952), Spanish-born U.S. philosopher, poet. The Life of Reason: The Phases of Human Progress, pt. 4, ch. 5, Scribner (1906).
When men and women agree, it is only in their conclusions; their reasons are always different.
George Santayana (1863-1952), Spanish-born U.S. philosopher, poet. The Life of Reason: The Phases of Human Progress, pt. 2, ch. 6, Scribner (1906).
Old age is as forgetful as youth, and more incorrigible; it displays the same inattentiveness to conditions; its memory becomes self-repeating and degenerates into an instinctive reaction, like a bird's chirp.
George Santayana (1863-1952), Spanish-born U.S. philosopher, poet. The Life of Reason: The Phases of Human Progress, pt. 1, ch. 10, Scribner (1906).
You cannot prove realism to a complete sceptic or idealist; but you can show an honest man that he is not a complete sceptic or idealist, but a realist at heart. So long as he is alive his sincere philosophy must fulfil the assumptions of his life and not destroy him.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, essayist. Originally published 1920. "Three Proofs of Realism," Essays in Critical Realism, New York (1968).
There is no cure for birth and death save to enjoy the interval.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "War Shrines," Soliloquies in England (1922).
America is a young country with an old mentality.
George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. Winds of Doctrine, ch. 6 (1913).