Gerard Manley Hopkins Quotes

I have desired to go Where springs not fail, To fields where flies no sharp and sided hail And a few lilies blow.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet. Heaven-Haven (l. 1-4). . . Gerard Manley Hopkins. Catherine Phillips, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
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And I have asked to be Where no storms come, Where the green swell is in the havens dumb, And out of the swing of the sea.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet. Heaven-Haven (l. 5-8). . . Gerard Manley Hopkins. Catherine Phillips, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
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Lovely the woods, waters, meadows, combes, vales, All the air things wear that build this world of Wales.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet, Jesuit priest. In the Valley of the Elwy, st. 2, Poems (1918).
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What would the world be, once bereft Of wet and of wildness? Let them be left, O let them be left, wildness and wet; Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet. Inversnaid (l. 13-16). . . Gerard Manley Hopkins. Catherine Phillips, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
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What would the world be, once bereft Of wet and wildness? Let them be left, O let them be left, wildness and wet; Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet, Jesuit priest. Inversnaid, st. 4 (written 1881), published in Poems (1918).
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I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours, O what black hours we have spent This night!
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet, Jesuit priest. I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Poems (1918).
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I awoke in the Midsummer not-to-call night, in the white and the walk of the morning:
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet. Moonrise (l. 1). . . Gerard Manley Hopkins. Catherine Phillips, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
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My own heart let me more have pity on; let Me live to my sad self hereafter kind, Charitable; not live this tormented mind With this tormented mind tormenting yet.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet. My own heart let me more have pity on (l. 1-4). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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all Life death does end and each day dies with sleep.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet. No Worst, There Is None (l. 13-14). . . Gerard Manley Hopkins. Catherine Phillips, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
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Natural heart's ivy, Patience masks Our ruins of wrecked past purpose.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet. Patience, hard thing! The hard thing but to pray (l. 6-7). . . Gerard Manley Hopkins. Catherine Phillips, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
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