Gertrude Stein Quotes

Poetry is concerned with using with abusing, with losing with wanting, with denying with avoiding with adoring with replacing the noun. It is doing that always doing that, doing that and doing nothing but that. Poetry is doing nothing but using losing refusing and pleasing and betraying and caressing nouns. That is what poetry does, that is what poetry has to do no matter what kind of poetry it is. And there are a great many kinds of poetry.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. "Poetry and Grammar," Lectures in America, Random House (1935).
(0) (0)
The question mark is alright when it is all alone when it is used as a brand on cattle or when it could be used in decoration but connected with writing it is completely entirely completely uninteresting.... A question is a question, anybody can know that a question is a question and so why add to it the question mark when it is already there when the question is already there in the writing.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. "Poetry and Grammar," Lectures in America, Random House (1935).
(0) (0)
When I said. A rose is a rose is a rose. And then later made that into a ring I made poetry and what did I do I caressed completely caressed and addressed a noun.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. "Poetry and Grammar," Lectures in America, Random House (1935). Stein wrote her celebrated line, "Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose," in "Sacred Emily" in 1914, originally published in Geography and Plays, 1922.
(0) (0)
It is natural to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes to that siren until she "allures" us to our death.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. (Written 1915). "Possessive Case," As Fine As Melanctha, Yale University Press (1954).
(0) (0)
Honesty is a selfish virtue. Yes I am honest enough.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. (Written 1903), originally published as Things As They Are 1950. "Q.E.D.," bk. 1, Fernhurst, Q.E.D., and Other Early Writings, Liveright (1971).
(0) (0)
There is no passion more dominant and instinctive in the human spirit than the need of the country to which one belongs.... The time comes when nothing in the world is so important as a breath of one's own particular climate. If it were one's last penny it would be used for that return passage.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. (Written 1903), originally published as Things As They Are (1950). "Q.E.D.," bk. 3, Fernhurst, Q.E.D., and Other Early Writings, Liveright (1971).
(0) (0)
The whole duty of man consists in being reasonable and just.... I am reasonable because I know the difference between understanding and not understanding and I am just because I have no opinion about things I I don't understand.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. (Written 1903). Q.E.D., book 1, Fernhurst, Q.E.D., and Other Early Writings, Liveright (1971).
(1) (0)
Oh, I wish I were a miser; being a miser must be so occupying.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Quoted by Thornton Wilder in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. George Plimpton (1958).
(0) (0)
Communists are people who fancied that they had an unhappy childhood.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Quoted by Thornton Wilder in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. George Plimpton (1958).
(1) (0)
All of you young people who served in the war. You are a lost generation.... You have no respect for anything. You drink yourselves to death.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Quoted in A Moveable Feast, ch. 3, Ernest Hemingway (1964). Remark to Hemingway, used by him as the epigraph in The Sun Also Rises (1926).
(1) (0)