Gertrude Stein Quotes

Would I if I could by pushing a button would I kill five thousand Chinamen if I could save my brother from anything. Well I was very fond of my brother and I could completely imagine his suffering and I replied that five thousand Chinamen was something I could not imagine and so it was not interesting. One has to remember that about imagination, that is when the world gets dull when everybody does not know what they can or what they cannot really imagine.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Everybody's Autobiography, ch. 3, Random House (1937).
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French people do like good fighting, they like it better than anything.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author; relocated to France. Wars I Have Seen (1945). Written in 1943.
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I rarely believe anything, because at the time of believing I am not really there to believe.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Everybody's Autobiography, ch. 3, Random House (1937).
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... every one is as their land is, as the climate is, as the mountains and the rivers or their oceans are as the wind and rain and snow and ice and heat and moisture is, they just are and that makes them have their way to eat their way to drink their way to act their way to think and their way to be subtle, and even if the lines of demarcation are only made with a ruler after all what is inside those right angles is different from those on the outside of those right angles, any American knows that.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author; relocated to France. Wars I Have Seen (1945). Written in occupied France in 1944, during World War II. Stein was finding that she missed the United States, where she had been born, raised, and educated, and where she still maintained citizenship, though she had long ago resettled permanently in France.
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Since the war nothing is so really frightening not the dark not alone in a room or anything on a road or a dog or a moon but two things, yes, indigestion and high places they are frightening.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Everybody's Autobiography, ch. 4, Random House (1937).
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... near a war it is always not very near.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author; relocated to France. Wars I Have Seen (1945). Written in 1943.
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The minute you or anybody else knows what you are you are not it, you are what you or anybody else knows you are and as everything in living is made up of finding out what you are it is extraordinarily difficult really not to know what you are and yet to be that thing.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Everybody's Autobiography, ch. 3 (1937).
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One of the things that is most striking about the young generation is that they never talk about their own futures, there are no futures for this generation, not any of them and so naturally they never think of them. It is very striking, they do not live in the present they just live, as well as they can, and they do not plan. It is extraordinary that whole populations have no projects for a future, none at all.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author; relocated to France. Wars I Have Seen (1945). Written in occupied France in 1944, during World War II.
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One thing is certain the only thing that makes you younger or older is that nothing can happen that is different from what you expected and when that happens and it mostly does happen everything is different from what you expected then there is no difference between being younger or older.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Everybody's Autobiography, ch. 2, Random House (1937).
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... when there is a war the years are longer that is to say the days are longer the months are longer the years are much longer but the weeks are shorter that is what makes a war.
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author; relocated to France. Wars I Have Seen (1945). Written in 1943.
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