Gilbert Keith Chesterton Quotes

If our caricaturists do not hate their enemies, it is not because they are too big to hate them, but because their enemies are not big enough to hate.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Conceit and Caricature," All Things Considered (1908).
Cruelty is, perhaps, the worst kid of sin. Intellectual cruelty is certainly the worst kind of cruelty.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Conceit and Caricature," All Things Considered (1908).
The family is the test of freedom; because the family is the only thing that the free man makes for himself and by himself.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Dramatic Unities," Fancies Versus Fads (1923).
All good men are international. Nearly all bad men are cosmopolitan. If we are to be international we must be national.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "French and English," All Things Considered (1908).
It is as healthy to enjoy sentiment as to enjoy jam.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Generally Speaking, "On Sentiment," (1928).
The man who throws a bomb is an artist, because he prefers a great moment to everything.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Gregory, in The Man Who Was Thursday, ch. 1 (1908).
There is no such thing on earth as an uninteresting subject; the only thing that can exist is an uninterested person.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Heretics, ch. 3 (1905).
Happiness is a mystery, like religion, and should never be rationalised.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Heretics, ch. 7 (1905).
If you do not understand a man you cannot crush him. And if you do understand him, very probably you will not.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Humanitarianism and Strength," Intimate Journals (1908).
Youth is the period in which a man can be hopeless. The end of every episode is the end of the world. But the power of hoping through everything, the knowledge that the soul survives its adventures, that great inspiration comes to the middle-aged.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Boyhood of Dickens," Charles Dickens (1906).