Gilbert Keith Chesterton Quotes

True contentment is a thing as active as agriculture. It is the power of getting out of any situation all that there is in it. It is arduous and it is rare.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Contented Man," A Miscellany of Men (1912).
"My country, right or wrong" is a thing that no patriot would think of saying except in a desperate case. It is like saying "My mother, drunk or sober."
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. The Defendant, "Defence of Patriotism," (1901). See Decatur.
All slang is metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. The Defendant, "A Defence of Slang," (1901).
What people call impartiality may simply mean indifference, and what people call partiality may simply mean mental activity.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Error of Impartiality," All Things Considered (1908).
Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes—our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to the small and arrogant oligarchy of those who merely happen to be walking around.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Ethics of England," ch. 4, Orthodoxy (1909).
We call a man a bigot or a slave of dogma because he is a thinker who has thought thoroughly and to a definite end.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Error of Impartiality," All Things Considered (1908).
The greenhorn is the ultimate victor in everything; it is he that gets the most out of life.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Fairy Pickwick," A Shilling for My Thoughts (1916).
A new philosophy generally means in practice the praise of some old vice.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Methuselahite," All Things Considered (1908).
The ordinary scientific man is strictly a sentimentalist. He is a sentimentalist in this essential sense, that he is soaked and swept away by mere associations.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Logic of Elfland," Orthodoxy (1908).
With any recovery from morbidity there must go a certain healthy humiliation.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. The Man Who Was Thursday, ch. 8 (1908).