Gilbert Keith Chesterton Quotes

The full value of this life can only be got by fighting; the violent take it by storm. And if we have accepted everything we have missed something—war. This life of ours is a very enjoyable fight, but a very miserable truce.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Optimism of Dickens," Charles Dickens (1906).
In matters of truth the fact that you don't want to publish something is, nine times out of ten, a proof that you ought to publish it.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Nameless Man," A Miscellany of Men (1912).
All architecture is great architecture after sunset; perhaps architecture is really a nocturnal art, like the art of fireworks.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Giant," Tremendous Trifles (1909).
Variability is one of the virtues of a woman. It avoids the crude requirement of polygamy. So long as you have one good wife you are sure to have a spiritual harem.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Glory of Grey," Alarms and Discursions (1910).
Your next-door neighbour ... is not a man; he is an environment. He is the barking of a dog; he is the noise of a pianola; he is a dispute about a party wall; he is drains that are worse than yours, or roses that are better than yours.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Irishman," The Uses of Diversity (1920).
One may understand the cosmos, but never the ego; the self is more distant than any star.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Logic of Elfland," Orthodoxy (1908).
There are many definite methods, honest and dishonest, which make people rich; the only "instinct" I know of which does it is that instinct which theological Christianity crudely describes as "the sin of avarice."
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Fallacy of Success," All Things Considered (1908).
When we really worship anything, we love not only its clearness but its obscurity. We exult in its very invisibility.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Fallacy of Success," All Things Considered (1908).
Man seems to be capable of great virtues but not of small virtues; capable of defying his torturer but not of keeping his temper.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Autobiography, ch. 11 (1936).
The aim of life is appreciation; there is no sense in not appreciating things; and there is no sense in having more of them if you have less appreciation of them.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Autobiography, ch. 11 (1936).