Gwendolyn Brooks Quotes

My Father, it is surely a blue place And straight. Right. Regular.
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. "Hunchback girl: she thinks of heaven."
(5) (4)
Oh Squalor! This sick four-story hulk, this fibre With fissures everywhere!
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. The Lovers of the Poor (l. 75-76). . . Selected Poems by Gwendolyn Brooks. (1963) Harper & Row.
(2) (4)
Life for my child is simple, and is good.
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. "II," from The Womanhood.
(3) (4)
The pink paint on the innocence of fear; Walk in a gingerly manner up the hall.
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. The Lovers of the Poor (l. 5-6). . . Selected Poems by Gwendolyn Brooks. (1963) Harper & Row.
(2) (4)
Not that success, for him, is sure, infallible. But never has he been afraid to reach. His lesions are legion. But reaching is his rule.
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. "II," from The Womanhood.
(7) (5)
They own Spode, Lowestoft, candelabra, Mantels, and hostess gowns, and sunburst clocks, Turtle soup, Chippendale, red stain "hangings," Aubussons and Hattie Carnegie.
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. The Lovers of the Poor (l. 67-70). . . Selected Poems by Gwendolyn Brooks. (1963) Harper & Row.
(4) (2)
She has taken her passive pigeon poor, She has buried him down and down. He never shall sally to Sally Nor soil any roofs of the town.
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. "III. The ballad of the light-eyed little girl."
(3) (3)
The worthy poor. The very very worthy And beautiful poor. Perhaps just not too swarthy? Perhaps just not too dirty nor too dim Nor—passionate.
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. The Lovers of the Poor (l. 22-25). . . Selected Poems by Gwendolyn Brooks. (1963) Harper & Row.
(6) (3)
"Now bury your bird," the wind it bawled, "And bury him down and down Who had to put his trust in one So light-eyed and so brown...."
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. "III. The ballad of the light-eyed little girl."
(4) (1)
The stench; the urine, cabbage, and dead beans, Dead porridges of assorted dusty grains, The old smoke, heavy diapers, and, they're told, Something called chitterlings.
Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917), U.S. poet. The Lovers of the Poor (l. 32-35). . . Selected Poems by Gwendolyn Brooks. (1963) Harper & Row.
(4) (1)