Henry David Thoreau Quotes

We communicate like the burrows of foxes, in silence and darkness, under ground. We are undermined by faith and love.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, February 12, 1843, to Ralph Waldo Emerson, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 57, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
As some heads cannot carry much wine, so it would seem that I cannot bear so much society as you can. I have an immense appetite for solitude, like an infant for sleep, and if I don't get enough of it this year, I shall cry all the next.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, September 9, 1857, to Daniel Ricketson, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 313, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
The man who thrusts his manners upon me does as if he were to insist on introducing me to his cabinet of curiosities, when I wished to see himself.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 478, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Whoever can discern truth has received his commission from a higher source than the chiefest justice in the world who can discern only law. He finds himself constituted judge of the judge. Strange that it should be necessary to state such simple truths!
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 396, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
We thought ourselves lucky to secure the services of this man, who was known to be particularly steady and trustworthy.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 175, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
It may be worth the while to state that he is not a Reformer in our sense of the term.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Thomas Carlyle and His Works" (1847), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 319, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Morning work! By the blushes of Aurora and the music of Memnon, what should be man's morning work in this world?
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 40, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
This whole earth which we inhabit is but a point in space.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 147, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
We are the subjects of an experiment which is not a little interesting to me.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 149, Houghton Mifflin (1906).