Henry David Thoreau Quotes

I am sure that I never read any memorable news in a newspaper.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 104, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Our whole life is startingly moral. There is never an instant's truce between virtue and vice.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 241, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Every nail driven should be as another rivet in the machine of the universe, you carrying on the work.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 364, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Politics are ... but as the cigar-smoke of a man.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 213, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Dreams are the touchstones of our characters.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 315, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Some interests have got a footing on the earth which we have not made sufficient allowance for.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 129, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Absolutely speaking, the more money, the less virtue; for money comes between a man and his objects, and obtains them for him; and it was certainly no great virtue to obtain it.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Civil Disobedience," originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government" (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 372, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
The mass never comes up to the standard of its best member, but on the contrary degrades itself to a level with the lowest.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Journals, entry for March 14, 1838 (1906).
It is surprising how contented one can be with nothing definite,—only a sense of existence. Well, anything for variety.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, December 6, 1856, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 294, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
Men cannot conceive of a state of things so fair that it cannot be realized.
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, March 27, 1848, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 162, Houghton Mifflin (1906).