Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Quotes

My own thoughts Are my companions; my designs and labors And aspirations are my only friends.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. "The Masque of Pandora."
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Thy fate is the common fate of all; Into each life some rain must fall.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. The Rainy Day, st. 3, Ballads and Other Poems (1842).
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There was a little girl Who had a little curl Right in the middle of her forehead, When she was good She was very, very good, But when she was bad she was horrid.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1822), U.S. poet. There Was A little Girl, E.W. Longfellow, Random Memories (1922). Composed for his infant daughter, c. 1850.
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There the wrinkled old Nokomis Nursed the little Hiawatha, Rocked him in his linden cradle, Bedded softin moss and rushes,
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Song of Hiawatha (l. 67-70). . . Family Book of Verse, The. Lewis Gannett, ed. (1961) Harper & Row.
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By the shores of Gitche Gumee, By the shining Big-Sea-Water, Stood the wigwam of Nokomis, Daughter of the Moon, Nokomis.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Song of Hiawatha (l. 57-60). . . Family Book of Verse, The. Lewis Gannett, ed. (1961) Harper & Row.
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Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their names and all their secrets,
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Song of Hiawatha (l. 125-128). . . Family Book of Verse, The. Lewis Gannett, ed. (1961) Harper & Row.
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The morning breaks; the steeds in their stalls Stamp and neigh, as the hostler calls; The day returns, but nevermore Returns the traveler to the shore, And the tide rises, the tide falls.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls (l. 11-15). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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The tide rises, the tide falls, The twilight darkens, the curlew calls; Along the sea-sands damp and brown The traveler hastens toward the town, And the tide rises, the tide falls.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls (l. 1-5). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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Toiling,—rejoicing,—sorrowing, Onward through life he goes; Each morning sees some task begin, Each evening sees its close; Something attempted, something done, Has earned a night's repose.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Village Blacksmith (l. 37-42). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
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Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend, For the lesson thou hast taught! Thus at the flaming forge of life Our fortunes must be wrought; Thus on its sounding anvil shaped Each burning deed and thought!
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Village Blacksmith (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
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