Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Quotes

In this world a man must either be anvil or hammer.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. Berkley, in "The Story of Brother Bernardus," Hyperion (1839).
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He is the poet of the dawn, who wrote The Canterbury Tales and his old age Made beautiful with song; and as I read I hear the crowing cock, I hear the note Of lark and linnet, and from every page Rise odors of ploughed field or flowery mead.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Chaucer (l. 9-14). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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And so we plough along, as the fly said to the ox.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. Chispa, in The Spanish Student, act 3, sc. 6 (1840).
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Then pealed the bells more loud and deep: "God is not dead; nor doth He sleep; The wrong shall fail, The right prevail, With peace on earth, good will to men."
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Christmas Bells (l. 16-20). . . Oxford Book of Christmas Poems, The. Michael Harrison and Christopher Stuart-Clark, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
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I heard the bells, on Christmas Day, Their old, familiar carols play, And wild and sweet The words repeat Of peace on earth, good will to men.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Christmas Bells (l. 1-5). . . Oxford Book of Christmas Poems, The. Michael Harrison and Christopher Stuart-Clark, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
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A torn jacket is soon mended; but hard words bruise the heart of a child.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (20th century), American poet. Collected Works, Vol. 2, Table Talk (1852).
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It whispered to the fields of corn, "Bow down, and hail the coming morn." It shouted through the belfry tower, "Awake, O bell! proclaim the hour." It crossed the churchyard with a sigh, And said, "Not yet! in quiet lie."
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Daybreak (l. 13-18). . . Poems That Live Forever. Hazel Felleman, ed. (1965) Doubleday & Company.
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A wind came up out of the sea, And said, "O mists, make room for me."
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Daybreak (l. 1-2). . . Poems That Live Forever. Hazel Felleman, ed. (1965) Doubleday & Company.
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Repeat thy song, till the familiar lines Are footpaths for the thought of Italy! Thy flame is blown abroad from all the heights, Through all the nations, and a sound is heard, As of a mighty wind, and men devout, Strangers of Rome, and the new proselytes, In their own language hear thy wondrous word, And many are amazed and many doubt.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Divina Commedia (translated by Longfellow) (Sect. 6, l. 7-14). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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O star of morning and of liberty!
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Divina Commedia (translated by Longfellow) (Sect. 6, l. 1). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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