Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Quotes

Like a French poem is life; being only perfect in structure When with the masculine rhymes mingled the feminine are.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. Elegiac Verse, st. 7.
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The shades of night were falling fast, As through an Alpine village passed A youth, who bore, 'mid snow and ice, A banner with the strange device, Excelsior!
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Excelsior (l. 1-5). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse in America, The. Donald Hall, ed. (1985) Oxford University Press.
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There in the twilight cold and gray, Lifeless, but beautiful, he lay, And from the sky, serene and far, A voice fell, like a falling star, Excelsior!
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Excelsior (l. 41-45). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse in America, The. Donald Hall, ed. (1985) Oxford University Press.
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The secret anniversaries of the heart.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. "Holidays," Sonnets (1876).
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The holiest of all holidays are those Kept by ourselves in silence and apart; The secret anniversaries of the heart.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. Holidays, Sonnets (1876).
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I heard the trailing garments of the Night Sweep through her marble halls! I saw her sable skirts all fringed with light From the celestial walls!
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Hymn to the Night (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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O holy Night! from thee I learn to bear What man has borne before! Thou layest thy finger on the lips of Care, And they complain no more.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. Hymn to the Night (l. 17-20). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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Enjoy the Spring of Love and Youth, To some good angel leave the rest; For Time will teach thee soon the truth, There are no birds in last year's nest!
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. It Is Not Always May.
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Many readers judge of the power of a book by the shock it gives their feelings—as some savage tribes determine the power of muskets by their recoil; that being considered best which fairly prostrates the purchaser.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. Kavanagh, bk. 1, ch. 13 (1849). One of the meditations of Mr. Churchill, inscribed on his pulpit.
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Men of genius are often dull and inert in society; as the blazing meteor, when it descends to earth, is only a stone.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. Kavanagh, bk. 1, ch. 13 (1849). One of the meditations of Mr. Churchill, inscribed on his pulpit.
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