Herman Melville Quotes

Surely no mere mortal who has at all gone down into himself will ever pretend that his slightest thought or act solely originates in his own defined identity.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Pierre (1852), bk. X, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 7, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1971).
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About the Shark, phlegmatical one, Pale sot of the Maldive sea, The sleek little pilot-fish, azure and slim,
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. poet, novelist. The Maldive Shark (l. 1-3). . . Selected Poems of Herman Melville. Hennig Cohen, ed. (1991) Fordham University Press.
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Let America first praise mediocrity even, in her children, before she praises ... the best excellence in the children of any other land.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Hawthorne And His Mosses," Literary World (August 17-24, 1850).
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Peradventure at this instant, there are beings gazing up to this very world as their future heaven.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 175, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.
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The earliest instinct of the child, and the ripest experience of age, unite in affirming simplicity to be the truest and profoundest part for man. Likewise this simplicity is so universal and all-containing as a rule for human life, that the subtlest bad man, and the purest good man, as well as the profoundest wise man, do all alike present it on that side which they socially turn to the inquisitive and unscrupulous world.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Pierre (1852), bk. XV, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 7, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1971).
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They are friends; and friendly they guide him to prey Yet never partake of the treat— Eyes and brains to the dotard lethargic and dull, Pale ravener of horrible meat.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. poet, novelist. The Maldive Shark (l. 13-16). . . Selected Poems of Herman Melville. Hennig Cohen, ed. (1991) Fordham University Press.
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In this world of lies, Truth is forced to fly like a scared white doe in the woodlands; and only by cunning glimpses will she reveal herself.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Hawthorne and His Mosses" (1850), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987).
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Dissenters only assent to more than we.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 97, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).
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Silence is the general consecration of the universe. Silence is the invisible laying on of the Divine Pontiff's hands upon the world. Silence is at once the most harmless and the most awful thing in all nature. It speaks of the Reserved Forces of Fate. Silence is the only Voice of our God.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Pierre (1852), bk. XIV, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 7, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1971).
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But some who this blithe mood present, As on in lightsome files they fare, Shall die experienced ere three days be spent— Perish, enlightened by the vollied glare; Or shame survive, and, like to adamant, Thy after shock, Manassas, share.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. poet, novelist. The March into Virginia (l. 31-36). . . Selected Poems of Herman Melville. Hennig Cohen, ed. (1991) Fordham University Press.
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