Herman Melville Quotes

War being the greatest of evils, all its accessories necessarily partake of the same character.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Omoo (1846), ch. 29, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 2, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1968).
Madam, or sir, would you visit on the butterfly the sins of the caterpillar?
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. The Confidence-Man (1857), ch. 22, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 10, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1984). Spoken by the bachelor.
All objects look well through an arch.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 67, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).
Charity, like poetry, should be cultivated, if only for its being graceful.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. The Confidence-Man (1857), ch. 28, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 10, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1984). Spoken by the cosmopolitan.
Death my lord!—it is the deadest of all things.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 163, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.
A beautiful woman is born Queen of men and women both, as Mary Stuart was born Queen of Scots, whether men or women.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Pierre (1852), bk. II, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 7, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1971).
To be the subject of alms-giving is trying, and to feel in duty bound to appear cheerfully grateful under the trial, must be still more so.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. The Confidence-Man (1857), ch. 3, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 10, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1984).
The poor man wants many things; the covetous man, all.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 124, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Babbalanja, the philosopher, reading from a book.
Cripples, above all men, should be companionable, or, at least, refrain from picking a fellow-limper to pieces.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. The Confidence-Man (1857), ch. 3, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 10, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1984).
Murder is catching.
Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 35, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).