Hilda Doolittle Quotes

shadow seeks shadow, then both leaf and leaf-shadow are lost.
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "H.D..." Evening (l. 17-19). . . Faber Book of Modern Verse, The. Michael Roberts, ed. (4th ed. revised by Peter Porter, 1982) Faber and Faber CP-Dool.
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Did she look (reft of her lover) at a face gone white under the chaplet of white virgin-breath?
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Lais."
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Is each one's reticence the other's food, or is this mood sheer poison to the other?
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Sigil" (first line: There is no sign-post to say).
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Until it seems the whole city (Venice-Venus) will be covered with gold pollen shaken from the bell-towers, lilies plundered with the weight of massive bees . . .
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Tribute to the Angels."
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You are even a world, a planet, and pass from history and the day's event. to myth and phantasy,
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Body and Soul."
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Black creeps from root to root, each leaf cuts another leaf on the grass, shadow seeks shadow, then both leaf and leaf-shadow are lost.
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Evening."
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The dog-wood breaks white The pear-tree has caught The apple is a red blaze The peach has already withered its own leaves The wild plum-tree is alight.
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Late Spring."
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"I love you," spoken in rhapsodic metre, leaves me cold: I have a horror of finality.
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Sigil" (first line: There is no sign-post to say).
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I testify to rainbow feathers, to the span of heaven and walls of colour, the colonnades of jasper.
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Tribute to the Angels."
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Why wait for Death to mow? why wait for Death to sow us in the ground?
Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Body and Soul."
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