James Joyce Quotes

I should tell you that honestly, on my honour of a Nearwicked, I always think in a wordworth's of that primed favourite continental poet, Daunty, Gouty and Shopkeeper, A.G., whom the generality admoyers in this that is and that this is to come.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, pt. 3 (1939).
(2) (0)
All moanday, tearsday, wailsday, thumpsday, frightday, shatterday till the fear of the Law.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, pt. 2 (1939).
(4) (0)
Ulysses is son to Laertes, but he is father to Telemachus, husband to Penelope, lover of Calypso, companion in arms of the Greek warriors around Troy, and King of Ithaca. He was subjected to many trials, but with wisdom and courage came through them all.... he is a complete man as well, a good man.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Frank Budgen, James Joyce and the Making of Ulysses, pp. 16-17, University of Indiana Press, reprint (1960). Transcribed by Budgen from a conversation with Joyce.
(2) (0)
Nations have their ego, just like individuals.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Public lecture originally at the Universita Popolare, an adult education center in Trieste, 1907. "Ireland, Island of Saints and Sages," The Critical Writings, eds. Richard Ellmann and Ellsworth Mason, Viking (1959).
(3) (0)
I confess that I do not see what good it does to fulminate against the English tyranny while the Roman tyranny occupies the palace of the soul.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Lecture, April 27, 1907, Università Popolare Triestina. "Ireland, Island of Saints and Sages," sct. 35, Critical Writings, eds. Ellsworth Mason and Richard Ellmann (1959).
(3) (0)
No one who has any self-respect stays in Ireland, but flees afar as though from a country that has undergone the visitation of an angered Jove.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. From a public lecture delivered at the Universita Popolare, an adult education center in Trieste in 1907. "Ireland, Island of Saints and Sages," The Critical Writings, eds. Richard Ellmann and Ellsworth Mason, Viking (1959).
(2) (0)
When the Irishman is found outside of Ireland in another environment, he very often becomes a respected man. The economic and intellectual conditions that prevail in his own country do not permit the development of individuality.... No one who has any self-respect stays in Ireland, but flees afar as though from a country that has undergone the visitation of an angered Jove.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Lecture, April 27, 1907, at Università Popolare Triestina. "Ireland, Island of Saints and Sages," sect. 35, published in Critical Writings, ed. Ellsworth Mason and Richard Ellmann (1959).
(2) (0)
The philosophic mind inclines always to an elaborate life—the life of Goethe or of Leonardo da Vinci; but the life of the poet is intense—the life of Blake or of Dante—taking into its centre the life that surrounds it and flinging it abroad again amid planetary music.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. address to the Literary and Historical Society of University College (1902); published in St. Stephen's magazine, May 1902. "James Clarence Mangan," The Critical Writings, eds. Richard Ellmann and Ellsworth Mason, Viking (1959). Joyce later included a version of the passage in his unfinished novel, Stephen Hero.
(2) (0)
Poetry, even when apparently most fantastic, is always a revolt against artifice, a revolt, in a sense, against actuality.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. lecture, February 15, 1902, University College, Dublin; repr. in Critical Writings, sct. 8, eds. Ellsworth Mason and Richard Ellmann (1959). "James Clarence Mangan," (first published 1902).
(2) (0)
A nation is the same people living in the same place.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Leopold Bloom, in Ulysses, ch. 12 (1922).
(2) (1)