James Joyce Quotes

All things are inconstant except the faith in the soul, which changes all things and fills their inconstancy with light, but though I seem to be driven out of my country as a misbeliever I have found no man yet with a faith like mine.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. letter from a private collection, Nov. 22, 1902. in which Joyce declared his intention of leaving Ireland for good. An inaccurate text, taken from a typescript of this letter, is printed in Letters of James Joyce, vol. 1 (1957).
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No pen, no ink, no table, no room, no time, no quiet, no inclination.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. letter, Dec. 7, 1906, to Joyce's brother, written from Rome in a state of disillusion. Letters of James Joyce, vol. 2 (1966). See Joyce on Italy and the Italians.
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I am damnably sick of Italy, Italian and Italians, outrageously, illogically sick.... I hate to think that Italians ever did anything in the way of art.... What did they do but illustrate a page or so of the New Testament! They themselves think they have a monopoly in the line. I am dead tired of their bello and bellezza.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. letter, Dec. 7, 1906, to his brother from Rome. Letters of James Joyce, vol. 2 (1966).
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My mouth is full of decayed teeth and my soul of decayed ambitions.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Letter, February 19, 1907, to his brother, Stanislaus Joyce. Letters of James Joyce, ed. Richard Ellmann, vol. 2, Viking (1966).
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... frseeeeeeeefronnnng train somewhere whistling the strength those engines have in them like big giants and the water rolling all over and out of them all sides like the end of Loves old sweeeetsonnnng the poor men that have to be out all the night from their wives and families in those roasting engines ...
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Molly Bloom, in Ulysses, ch. 18 of 1984 edition (1922). Molly Bloom's soliloquy.
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Love between man and man is impossible because there must not be sexual intercourse and friendship between man and woman is impossible because there must be sexual intercourse.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Mr. Duffy, in Dubliners, "A Painful Case," (1914). Of his relationship with Mrs. Sinico.
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Wind whines and whines the shingle, The crazy pierstakes groan;
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish writer. On the Beach at Fontana (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of Modern Verse, The, 1892-1935. William Butler Yeats, ed. (1936) Oxford University Press.
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Around us fear, descending Darkness of fear above And in my heart how deep unending Ache of love!
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish writer. On the Beach at Fontana (l. 9-12). . . Oxford Book of Modern Verse, The, 1892-1935. William Butler Yeats, ed. (1936) Oxford University Press.
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An improper art aims at exciting in the way of comedy the feeling of desire but the feeling which is proper to comic art is the feeling of joy.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Manuscript notebook composed in Paris, 1903-1904. Paris Notebook, The Critical Writings, eds. Richard Ellmann and Ellsworth Mason, Viking (1959). Many of the entries in this notebook were later transposed into Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Ulysses (1922).
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When I heard the word "stream" uttered with such a revolting primness, what I think of is urine and not the contemporary novel. And besides, it isn't new, it is far from the dernier cri. Shakespeare used it continually, much too much in my opinion, and there's Tristam Shandy, not to mention the Agamemnon.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Quoted in Frederic Prokosch, Voices: A Memoir, "At Sylvia's," (1983). referring to "the stream of consciousness." Joyce was replying to the assertion by the young author and poet Prokosch that Molly Bloom's final monologue in Ulysses represented this form. "Molly Bloom was a down-to-earth lady," Joyce said. "She would never have indulged in anything so refined as a stream of consciousness."
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