James Joyce Quotes

If Ireland is to become a new Ireland she must first become European.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Exiles, Act I, Exiles, introduction by Padraic Colum, Viking (1951). Joyce generally agrees with this sentiment, though it is voiced in the play by Robert, who is, in many respects, contemptible.
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His unremitting intellect is the hornmad Iago ceaselessly willing that the moor in him shall suffer.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 9, "Scylla and Charybdis," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Stephen Dedalus on Shakespeare and jealousy.
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Why the title Exiles? A nation exacts a penance from those who dared leave her payable on their return.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Exiles, Appendix of "Notes by the author," Exiles, introduction by Padraic Colum, Viking (1951). These notes were written in a copy-book Joyce prepared while writing the play.
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Professor Bloom is a finished example of the new womanly man. His moral nature is simple and lovable. Many have found him a dear man, a dear person. He is a rather quaint fellow on the whole, coy though not feebleminded in the medical sense. He has written a really beautiful letter, a poem in itself, to the court missionary of the Reformed Priests' Protection Society which clears up everything. He is practically a total abstainer and I can affirm that he sleeps on a straw litter and eats the most Spartan food, cold dried grocer's peas. He wears a hairshirt of pure Irish manufacture winter and summer and scourges himself every Saturday. He was, I understand, at one time a firstclass misdemeanant in Glencree reformatory. Another report states that he was a very posthumous child. I appeal for clemency in the name of the most sacred word our vocal organs have ever been called upon to speak. He is about to have a baby.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 15, "Circe," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Dr. Dixon is speaking of Leopold Bloom in one of the comical hallucination sections of "Circe."
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So you need hardly spell me how every word will be bound over to carry three score and ten toptypsical readings throughout the book of Doublends Jined.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section i, Penguin (1976). The way meaning is derived in Finnegans Wake, which joins the ends of the story of Dublin and environs in the manner of a Mobius strip.
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Do fish ever get seasick.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 13, "Nausicaa," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). One of Leopold Bloom's random questions during the day.
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He even ran away with hunself and became a farsoonerite, saying he would far sooner muddle through the hash of lentils in Europe than meddle with Irrland's split little pea.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section vi, Penguin (1976). Shem the Penman's exile in Europe.
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Jewgreek is greekjew.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 15, "Circe," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). An observation by the hallucinating "cap" in "Circe" that sums up Joyce's adaptation of the Homeric Odyssey for Ulysses.
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Riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section i, Penguin (1976). The opening sentence of Finnegans Wake joins the river Liffey and Howth Head mountain while inscribing the book's circular form.
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I dont care what anybody says itd be much better for the world to be governed by the women in it you wouldnt see women going and killing one another and slaughtering when do you ever see women rolling around drunk like they do or gambling every penny they have and losing it on horses yes because a woman whatever she does she knows where to stop sure they wouldnt be in the world at all only for us....
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 18, "Penelope," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Molly Bloom's monologue.
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