James Joyce Quotes

In the beginning was the gest he jousstly says, for the end is with woman, flesh-without-word, while the man to be is in a worse case after than before since she on the supine satisfies the verg to him!
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part III, section ii, Penguin (1976). One of Joyce's many descriptions of writing that links language and sex.
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As for them saying theres no God I wouldnt give a snap of my two fingers for all their learning why dont they go and create something I often asked him atheists or whatever they call themselves go and wash the cobbles off themselves first when they go howling for the priest and they dying and why why because theyre afraid of hell on account of their bad conscience ah yes I know them well who was the first person in the universe before there was anybody that made it all who ah that they dont know neither do I so there you are they might as well try to stop the sun from rising tomorrow the sun shines for you he said the day we were lying among the rhododendrons on Howth head.....
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 18, "Penelope," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Molly Bloom's monologue.
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Three quarks for Muster Mark!
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, pt. 2 (1939). This seabirds' chorus provided the name for the hypothetical particle postulated by physicists Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1963.
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—But it's no use, says he. Force, hatred, history, all that. That's not life for men and women, insult and hatred. And everybody knows that it's the very opposite of that that is really life. MWhat? says Alf. MLove, says Bloom. I mean the opposite of hatred.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 12, "Cyclops," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Of Leopold Bloom.
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The pleasures of love lasts but a fleeting but the pledges of life outlusts a lieftime.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part III, section ii, Penguin (1976). One of Joyce's key thematic statements about the nature of love, narrative and human bonds.
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—I am the resurrection and the life. That touches a man's inmost heart. —It does, Mr Bloom said. Your heart perhaps but what price the fellow in the six feet by two with his toes to the daisies? No touching that. Seat of the affections. Broken heart. A pump after all, pumping thousands of gallons of blood every day. One fine day it gets bunged up: and there you are. Lots of them lying around here: lungs, hearts, livers. Old rusty pumps: damn the thing else. The resurrection and the life. Once you are dead you are dead. That last day idea. Knocking them all up out of their graves. Come forth, Lazarus! And he came fifth and lost the job. Get up! Last day! Then every fellow mousing around for his liver and his lights and the rest of his traps. Find damn all of himself that morning.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 6, "Hades," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Leopold Bloom moves from dialogue with a fellow Dubliner, Tom Kernan, to interior discourse in one of the best examples in the text of Joyce's innovative narrative technique.
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And the first till last alshemist wrote over every square inch of the only foolscap available, his own body, till by its corrosive sublimation one continuous present tense integument slowly unfolded all marryvoising moodmoulded cyclewheeling history....
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section vi, Penguin (1976). Shem the Penman's story becomes the story of the race, as is the case for the story of the artist in all of Joyce's works.
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—Dead! says Alf. He's no more dead than you are. —Maybe so, says Joe. They took the liberty of burying him this morning anyhow.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 12, "Cyclops," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). A typical Irish witticism in Ulysses, in this case about the man ( Paddy Dignam) who was buried on the day the novel is set.
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Life, he himself said once, (his biografiend, in fact, kills him verysoon, if yet not, after) is a wake, livit or kirkit, and on the bunk of our breadwinning lies the cropse of our seedfather, a phrase which the establisher of the world by law might pretinately write across the chestfront of all manorwomanborn.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section ii, Penguin (1976). The pattern of Finnegans Wake is the constant reenlivening of dead matter, which is also the pattern of mythology and world history in the book.
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Saying that a great genius is mad, while at the same time recognizing his artistic worth, is like saying that he had rheumatism or suffered from diabetes. Madness, in fact, is a medical term that can claim no more notice from the objective critic than he grants the charge of heresy raised by the theologian, or the charge of immorality raised by the police.
James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Lecture, March 1912, Università Popolare Triestina. "William Blake," sct. 43, Critical Writings, eds. Ellsworth Mason and Richard Ellmann (1959).
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