James Russell Lowell Comments (10)

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James Russell Lowell ‘s poems speak volumes to me.
Mr. Lowell wrote a short poem for Grover Cleveland that began with: " Let who has felt compute the strain of struggle with abuses strong. I have memorized it but why can't I find it among his poems, listed here?
Yooo just saw my boi James Russell in heaven broo
I have an old copy of works by Lowell - It is inscribed " To Will H. White, From Warren Hubbard, June 13th,1911" . It has gold leafing on ole leather cover. It is Poems of James Russell Lowell with biographical Sketch by Nathan Haskell Dole. Thomas Y. Crowell & Co. publishers. Copywright,1892,1898. I was just wondering if this copy is worth anything. I can be reached at margegogin@gmail.com.
“The First Snowfall” is about Lowell’s thinking of the snow coverering his daughter’s grave at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge MA where he, too, is buried. This is the poem that Mevelyn is referring to. “She Came and Went” which is about life’s brevity and the little time we have with each other is about the same passing of his daughter.
I’m looking for a poem by James Russell Lowell that he wrote about his daughters death.
“ there’s a narrow ridge in the graveyard Would scarce...... ———-/—/—————-/- Immortal? I know it and feel it. Who doubts it of such as she? But that is the pang’s very Secret Immortal.. away from me.
EXCELLENT POET GREAT! BRAVO! 10++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I'm looking for the name of a poem by JTL about winter. I remember some words, perhaps not accurate: The snow had begun in the gloaming and busily all the night, had been heaping field and byway with a silence deep and bright. Every pine, fir and hemlock wore ermine too deep for an Earl. And the poorest twig on the elm tree was ridged inch deep in pearl.