James Thomson Quotes

To sunny waters some By fatal instinct fly; where on the pool They sportive wheel, or, sailing down the stream, Are snatched immediate by the quick-eyed trout Or darting salmon.
James Thomson (1700-1748), Scottish poet. Summer (l. 71-75). . . Fellow Mortals; an Anthology of Animal Verse. Roy Fuller, comp. (1981) MacDonald and Evans Ltd.
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he dreadful darts With rapid glide along the leaning line; And, fixing in the wretch his cruel fangs
James Thomson (1700-1748), Scottish poet. Summer (l. 71-75). . . Fellow Mortals; an Anthology of Animal Verse. Roy Fuller, comp. (1981) MacDonald and Evans Ltd.
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But chief to heedless flies the window proves A constant death; where gloomily retired, The villain spider lives, cunning and fierce, Mixture abhorred! Amid a mangled heap Of carcases in eager watch he sits, O'erlooking all his waving snares around.
James Thomson (1700-1748), Scottish poet. Summer (l. 71-75). . . Fellow Mortals; an Anthology of Animal Verse. Roy Fuller, comp. (1981) MacDonald and Evans Ltd.
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The mighty river flowing dark and deep, With ebb and flood from the remote sea-tides Vague-sounding through the City's sleepless sleep, Is named the River of the Suicides;
James Thomson (1834-1882), Irish poet ("B.V."; "Bysshe Vanolis"). The City of Dreadful Night (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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The street-lamps burn amidst the baleful glooms, Amidst the soundless solitudes immense Of ranged mansions dark and still as tombs.
James Thomson (1834-1882), Irish poet ("B.V."; "Bysshe Vanolis"). The City of Dreadful Night (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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The City is of Night; perchance of Death, But certainly of Night; for never there Can come the lucid morning's fragrant breath After the dewy dawning's cold grey air;
James Thomson (1834-1882), Irish poet ("B.V."; "BYSSHE VANOLIS"). The City of Dreadful Night (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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Lo, thus, as prostrate, \'In the dust I write My heart's deep languor and my soul's sad tears.' Yet why evoke the spectres of black night To blot the sunshine of exultant years?
James Thomson (1834-1882), Irish poet ("B.V."; "Bysshe Vanolis"). The City of Dreadful Night (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Scottish Verse, The. John MacQueen and Tom Scott, comps. (1966) Oxford University Press.
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They have much wisdom yet they are not wise, They have much goodness yet they do not well, (The fools we know have their own Paradise, The wicked also have their proper Hell);
James Thomson (1834-1882), Irish poet ("B.V."; "Bysshe Vanolis"). The City of Dreadful Night (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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For life is but a dream whose shapes return, Some frequently, some seldom, some by night And some by day,
James Thomson (1834-1882), Irish poet ("B.V."; "Bysshe Vanolis"). The City of Dreadful Night (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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The City is of Night, but not of Sleep; There sweet sleep is not for the weary brain; The pitiless hours like years and ages creep,
James Thomson (1834-1882), Irish poet ("B.V"; "Bysshe Vanolis"). The City of Dreadful Night (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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