Jane Austen Quotes

What fine weather this is! Not very becoming perhaps early in the morning, but very pleasant out of doors at noon, and very wholesome—at least everybody fancies so, and imagination is everything.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, November 17, 1798, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(27) (16)
The work is rather too light, bright, and sparkling; it wants shade; it wants to be stretched out here and there with a long chapter of sense, if it could be had; if not of solemn specious nonsense, about something unconnected with the story; an essay on writing, a critique of Walter Scott, or a history of Buonaparte, or anything that would form a contrast, and bring the reader with increased delight to the playfulness and epigrammatism of the general style.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, February 4, 1813, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952). About her novel, Pride and Prejudice.
(26) (18)
Do not be in a hurry; depend upon it, the right Man will come at last; you will in the course of the next two or three years, meet with somebody more generally unexceptional than anyone you have yet known, who will love you as warmly as ever He did, and who will so completely attach you, that you will feel you never really loved before.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, March 13, 1817, to her niece, Fanny Knight. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(27) (18)
You are now collecting your People delightfully, getting them exactly into such as spot as is the delight of my life; M3 or 4 Families in a Country Village is the very thing to work on.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, September 9, 1814, to her niece, Anna Austen. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(16) (18)
Nothing is to be compared to the misery of being bound without Love, bound to one, & preferring another. That is a Punishment which you do not deserve.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, November 30, 1814, to her niece, Fanny Knight. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(8) (4)
A classical education, or at any rate a very extensive acquaintance with English literature, ancient and modern, appears to me quite indispensable for the person who would do any justice to your clergyman; and I think I may boast myself to be, with all possible vanity, the most unlearned and uninformed female who ever dared to be an authoress.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, December 11, 1815, to James Clarke. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(4) (2)
An artist cannot do anything slovenly.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, November 17, 1798, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(22) (4)
Single Women have a dreadful propensity for being poor—which is one very strong argument in favor of Matrimony.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, March 13, 1817, to her niece, Fanny Knight. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(5) (2)
I begin already to weigh my words and sentences more than I did, and am looking about for a sentiment, an illustration or a metaphor in every corner of the room. Could my Ideas flow as fast as the rain in the Store closet it would be charming.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, January 24, 1809, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(4) (2)
I must confess that I think her as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, January 29, 1813, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952). About her character, Elizabeth Bennet, from Pride and Prejudice.
(4) (2)