Jane Austen Quotes

There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 31 (1816).
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Husbands and wives generally understand when opposition will be vain.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 7 (1818).
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A single woman, with a very narrow income, must be a ridiculous, disagreeable, old maid! the proper sport of boys and girls; but a single woman, of good fortune, is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as anybody else.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 10 (1816).
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Personal size and mental sorrow have certainly no necessary proportions. A large bulky figure has a good a right to be in deep affliction, as the most graceful set of limbs in the world. But, fair or not fair, there are unbecoming conjunctions, which reason will pa tronize in vain,—which taste cannot tolerate,—which ridicule will seize.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 8 (1818).
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It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage. A man always imagines a woman to be ready for anybody who asks her.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 8 (1816).
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How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 2 (1818).
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There are people, the more you do for them, the less they do for themselves.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma's thought, in Emma, ch. 11 (1816).
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The public ... is rather apt to be unreasonably discontented when a woman does marry again, than when she does not.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 1 (1818).
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General benevolence, but not general friendship, made a man what he ought to be.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma's thought, in Emma, ch. 37 (1816).
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To be claimed as good, though in an improper style, is at least better than being rejected as no good at all.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 5 (1818).
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