Jane Austen Quotes

If the warmth of her Language could affect the Body it might be worth reading in this weather.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, January 17, 1809, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(1) (0)
Lady Sondes' match surprises, but does not offend me; had her first marriage been of affection, or had their been a grown-up daughter, I should not have forgiven her; but I consider everybody as having a right to marry once in their lives for love, if they can.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, December 27, 1808, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(1) (0)
I wish you would not let him plunge into a ôvortex of Dissipation.ö I do not object to the Thing, but I cannot bear the expression; it is such thorough novel slang—and so old, that I dare say Adam met with it in the first novel he opened.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, September 28, 1814, to her niece, Anna Austen. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(1) (0)
She found his manners very pleasing indeed.—The little flaw of having a Mistress now living with him at Ashdown Park, seems to be the only unpleasing circumstance about him.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, January 8, 1801, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(2) (0)
I do not write for such dull elves As have not a great deal of ingenuity themselves.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, January 29, 1813, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(1) (0)
We are to have a tiny party here tonight; I hate tiny parties—they force one into constant exertion.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, May 21, 1801, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(1) (0)
Your letter is come; it came indeed twelve lines ago, but I could not stop to acknowledge it before, & I am glad it did not arrive till I had completed my first sentence, because the sentence had been made since yesterday, & I think forms a very good beginning.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, November 1, 1800, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(1) (0)
Mrs. Hall, of Sherborne, was brought to bed yesterday of a dead child, some weeks before she was expected, owing to a fright. I suppose that she happened unawares to look at her husband.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, October 27, 1798, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(1) (0)
Mrs. John Lyford is so much pleased with the state of widowhood as to be going to put in for being a widow again; she is to marry a Mr. Fendall.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, January 8, 1801, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(2) (0)
Mrs. Powlett was at once expensively nakedly dress'd; we have had the satisfaction of estimating her Lace & her Muslin; & she said too little to afford us much other amusement.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, January 8, 1801, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
(1) (0)