Jane Austen Quotes

Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever does.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. John Knightley, in Emma, ch. 34 (1816).
(17) (5)
It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;Mit is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 12 (1811).
(12) (4)
Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mary Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 5 (1813).
(19) (1)
Unhappy as the event must be ... we may draw from it this useful lesson: that loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behaviour towards the undeserving of the other sex.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mary Bennet, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 47 (1813). On the elopement of Lydia Bennet with Wickham.
(1) (0)
Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mary Crawford in Mansfield Park, ch. 7 (1814).
(13) (5)
It is indolence ... indolence and love of ease; a want of all laudable ambition, of taste for good company, or of inclination to take the trouble of being agreeable, which make men clergymen. A clergyman has nothing to do but be slovenly and selfish; read the newspaper, watch the weather, and quarrel with his wife. His curate does all the work and the business of his own life is to dine.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mary Crawford, in Mansfield Park, ch. 11 (1814). "It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation." (Edmund, in Mansfield Park, ch. 9).
(1) (0)
Where an opinion is general, it is usually correct.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mary Crawford, in Mansfield Park, ch. 11 (1814).
(5) (0)
A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Miss Bingley, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 10 (1813).
(3) (0)
For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. Bennet, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 57 (1813).
(4) (0)
You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. Bennet, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 1 (1813). In answer to Mrs. Bennet's accusation that he had "no compassion on my poor nerves."
(5) (0)