Jane Austen Quotes

A Mr. (save, perhaps, some half dozen in the nation,) always needs a note of explanation.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Sir Walter Eliot in Persuasion, ch. 3 (1818).
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It was a sweet view—sweet to the eye and the mind. British verdure, British culture, British comfort, seen under a sun bright, without being oppressive.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 42 (1816).
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The ladies here probably exchanged looks which meant, "Men never know when things are dirty or not;" and the gentlemen perhaps thought each to himself, "Women will have their little nonsense and needless cares."
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 29 (1816).
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Goldsmith tells us, that when lovely woman stoops to folly, she has nothing to do but to die; and when she stoops to be disagreeable, it is equally to be recommended as a clearer of ill-fame.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 45 (1816).
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Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 49 (1816).
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It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively, without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind; Mbut when a beginning is made—when felicities of rapid motion have once been, though slightly, felt—it must be a very heavy set that does not ask for more.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 28 (1816).
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What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. letter, Sept. 18, 1796.
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What did she say?—Just what she ought, of course. A lady always does.—She said enough to show there need not be despair—and to invite him to say more himself.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma; of Emma, ch. 49 (1816).
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Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove any thing.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Anne Elliot in Persuasion, ch. 23 (1818).
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Children of the same family, the same blood, with the same first associations and habits, have some means of enjoyment in their power, which no subsequent connections can supply; and it must be by a long and unnatural estrangement, by a divorce which no subsequent connection can justify, if such precious remains of the earliest attachments are ever entirely outlived.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 24 (1814).
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