Jane Austen Quotes

History, real solemn history, I cannot be interested in.... I read it a little as a duty; but it tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me. The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Catherine Morland, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 14 (1818).
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There are certainly not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 1 (1814).
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Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other, or ever so similar before-hand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Charlotte Lucas in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 6 (1813).
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A young woman, pretty, lively, with a harp as elegant as herself; and both placed near a window, cut down to the ground, and opening on a little lawn, surrounded in the rich foliage of summer, was enough to catch any man's heart. The season, the scene, the air, were all favourable to tenderness and sentiment.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 7 (1814).
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Without thinking highly either of men or of matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small for tune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Charlotte Lucas in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 22 (1813).
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In all the important preparations of the mind she was complete; being prepared for matrimony by an hatred of home, restraint, and tranquillity; by the misery of disappointed affection, and contempt of the man she was to marry. The rest might wait. The preparations of new carriages and furniture might wait for London and the spring, when her own taste could have fairer play.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park; of Maria Bertram, ch. 21 (1814).
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There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Colonel Brandon in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 11 (1811).
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Dress is at all times a frivolous distinction, and excessive solicitude about it often destroys its own aim.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 10 (1818).
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Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Darcy, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 10 (1813).
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Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 4 (1818).
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