Jane Vance Rule Quotes

As a writer, I must be free to say what is in all the diversity I can command. I regret the distorting prejudices that surround me, whether they affect homosexuals or men or the physically handicapped and I can't alone defeat them. They will not defeat me, either as a lesbian or a writer.
Jane Rule (b. 1931), Canadian lesbian, feminist, fiction writer, and essayist; born in the U.S. A Hot-Eyed Moderate, part 1 (1985).
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The message of women's liberation is that women can love each other and ourselves against our degrading education.
Jane Rule (b. 1931), Canadian lesbian, feminist, fiction writer, and essayist; born in the U.S. A Hot-Eyed Moderate, part 2 (1985).
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Charity is a cop-out so traditionally female in its apparent self-effacement that there seems resonant comfort in it. We're no longer supposed to serve the imaginations of men who have dominated us. We are to give up ourselves instead to those whose suffering is greater than our own. Looking down is just as distorting as looking up and as dangerous in perpetuating hierarchies.
Jane Rule (b. 1931), Canadian fiction writer and essayist; born in the U.S. A Hot-Eyed Moderate, part 1 (1985).
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The terrifying message of gay liberation is that men are capable of loving their brothers. It should be sweet news to every woman in the world, for, if the capacity of men to love whom they have been taught to treat as competitors and enemies can transcend their education, the world can begin to heal.
Jane Rule (b. 1931), Canadian lesbian, feminist, fiction writer, and essayist; born in America. A Hot-Eyed Moderate, part 2 (1985).
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Morality for the novelist is expressed not so much in the choice of subject matter as in the plot of the narrative, which is perhaps why in our morally bewildered time novelists have often been timid about plot.
Jane Rule (b. 1931), Canadian fiction writer and essayist; born in the U. S... Outlander, part 2, essay 1 (1981). Many of Rule's story and novel plots centered around lesbian relationships.
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Now that our sexual experience is increasingly available to us as a subject for contemplation, we have to extend our language to express our new consciousness until we have as many words for sexuality as the Eskimo has for snow, that pervasive, beautiful, and mortal climate in which we all live.
Jane Rule (b. 1931), Canadian fiction writer and essayist; born in the U. S... Outlander, part 2, essay 1 (1981). Rule was a lesbian who wrote extensively about sexuality and sexual relationships (both heterosexual and homosexual) in her fiction and essays.
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Coming out, all the way out, is offered more and more as the political solution to our oppression. The argument goes that, if people could see just how many of us there are, some in very important places, the negative stereotype would vanish overnight. ...It is far more realistic to suppose that, if the tenth of the population that is gay became visible tomorrow, the panic of the majority of people would inspire repressive legislation of a sort that would shock even the pessimists among us.
Jane Rule (b. 1931), Canadian fiction writer and essayist; born in the U. S... Outlander, part 2, essay 10 (1981). Rule was a lesbian. Her assumption that a "tenth" of the population was gay or lesbian was widespread at the time, based largely on the famous Kinsey studies of sexuality. More recently, that percentage has been questioned as perhaps too high, especially if exclusive or almost exclusive homosexuality, rather than simply some homosexual activity, is the issue.
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