John Donne Quotes

Full nakedness! All my joys are due to thee, As souls unbodied, bodies unclothed must be, To taste whole joys.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. "To His Mistress Going to Bed," Elegies (1669), composed (1590-1600).
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Not thou nor thy religion dost controule, The amorousnesse of an harmonious Soule, But thou would'st have that love thy selfe: As thou Art jealous, Lord, so I am jealous now, Thou lov'st not, till from loving more, thou free My soule: Who ever gives, takes libertie: O, if thou car'st not whom I love Alas, thou lov'st not mee.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. A Hymn to Christ, at the Author's Last Going into Germany (l. 17-24). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Then, since that I may know, As liberally as to a midwife, show Thyself: cast all, yea, this white linen hence, Here is no penance, much less innocence. To teach thee, I am naked first; why than, What needst thou have more covering than a man.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. To His Mistress Going to Bed. . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Sweare by thy selfe, that at my death thy Sonne Shall shine as he shines now, and heretofore; And having done that, thou hast done, I feare no more.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. A Hymn to God the Father (l. 15-18). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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License my roving hands, and let them go Before, behind, between, above, below. O my America! my new-found-land, My kingdom, safeliest when with one man manned, My mine of precious stones, my empery, How blest am I in this discovering thee! To enter in these bonds is to be free; Then where my hand is set, my seal shall be.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. To His Mistress Going to Bed. . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Love must not be, but take a body too, And therefore what thou wert, and who, I bid Love aske, and now That it assume thy body, I allow, And fixe it selfe in thy lip, eye, and brow.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Air and Angels (l. 10-14). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Licence my roving hands, and let them go Before, behind, between, above, below. O my America, my new found land, My kingdom, safeliest when with one man manned.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). To His Mistress Going to Bed, Elegies (1633).
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Love is a growing, or full constant light; And his first minute, after noone, is night.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. A Lecture upon the Shadow (l. 25-26). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Nor can you more judge womans thoughts by tears, Than by her shadow, what she weares. O perverse sexe, where none is true but shee, Who's therefore true, because her truth kills mee.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Twickenham Garden (l. 24-27). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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And new Philosophy calls all in doubt, The element of fire is quite put out; The Sun is lost, and th'earth, and no mans wit Can well direct him where to look for it.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). An Anatomy of the World: First Anniversary, l. 205-8 (1611).
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