John Donne Quotes

Be thine own palace, or the world's thy jail.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Verse Letter to Sir Henry Wotton.
(7) (0)
Wicked is not much worse than indiscreet.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). An Anatomy of the World: First Anniversary (1611).
(11) (8)
Sir, more than kisses, letters mingle souls. For, thus friends absent speak.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Verse Letter to Sir Henry Wotton (1597-1598). Opening lines.
(3) (2)
Study me then, you who shall lovers be At the next world, that is, at the next spring: For I am every dead thing, In whom love wrought new alchemy. For his art did express A quintessence even from nothingness, From dull privations, and lean emptiness: He ruined me, and I am re-begot Of absence, darkness, death: things which are not.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. A Nocturnal upon Saint Lucy's Day, Being the Shortest Day (l. 10-18). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
(1) (0)
Reason is our soul's left hand, Faith her right, By these we reach divinity.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Verse Letter to the Countess of Bedford (written c. 1607-1608, published 1633).
(2) (2)
At the round earth's imagined corners, blow Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise From death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go,
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. At the round earth's imagined corners (Holy Sonnets) (l. 1-4). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
(1) (0)
No, no; but as in my idolatry I said to all my profane mistresses, Beauty, of pity, foulness only is A sign of rigour: so I say to thee, To wicked spirits are horrid shapes assign'd, This beauteous form assures a piteous mind.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. What if this present (Holy Sonnets) (l. 9-14). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
(2) (0)
Dull sublunary lovers' love, Whose soul is sense, cannot admit Absence, because it doth remove Those things which elemented it. But we by a love so much refined That our selves know not what it is, Interassured of the mind, Careless eyes, lips, and hands to miss. Our two souls therefore, which are one, Though I must go, endure not yet A breach, but an expansion, Like gold to airy thinness beat.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning (l. 13-24). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(2) (0)
What if this present were the world's last night? Mark in my heart, O Soul, where thou dost dwell, The picture of Christ crucified, and tell Whether that countenance can thee affright,
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. What if this present (Holy Sonnets) (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
(2) (1)
If they be two, they are two so As stiff twin compasses are two; Thy soul, the fixed foot, makes no show To move, but doth if th' other do.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning (l. 25-28). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(3) (1)