John Donne Quotes

I would not that death should take me asleep. I would not have him meerly seise me, and onely declare me to be dead, but win me, and overcome me. When I must shipwrack, I would do it in a sea, where mine impotencie might have some excuse; not in a sullen weedy lake, where I could not have so much as exercise for my swimming.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine and metaphysical poet. letter, Sept. 1608. Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929).
(5) (2)
One short sleep past, we wake eternally, And Death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die!
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Death Be Not Proud, no. 6, Holy Sonnets (1609).
(17) (2)
God employs several translators; some pieces are translated by age, some by sickness, some by war, some by justice.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 17 (1624).
(9) (3)
When one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 17 (1624).
(178) (41)
No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main.... Any man's death diminishes me because I am involved in Mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Meditation 17 (1624).
(72) (12)
No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main.... Any man's death diminishes me because I am involved in Mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 17 (1624). "To be no part of any body, is to be nothing." (letter, Sept. 1608, to Sir Henry Goodyer, published in Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward, 1929).
(218) (49)
But I do nothing upon myself, and yet am mine own executioner.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 12 (1624).
(106) (37)
When one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 17 (1624).
(13) (2)
God employs several translators; some pieces are translated by age, some by sickness, some by war, some by justice.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 17 (1624).
(5) (3)
Humiliation is the beginning of sanctification.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Eighty Sermons, sermon 7 (1640).
(110) (42)