John Donne Quotes

I throw myself down in my chamber, and I call in, and invite God, and his Angels thither, and when they are there, I neglect God and his Angels, for the noise of a fly, for the rattling of a coach, for the whining of a door.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Eighty Sermons, no. 80, sct. 3 (preached Dec. 12, 1626, published 1640).
(12) (1)
We are all conceived in close prison; in our mothers' wombs, we are close prisoners all; when we are born, we are born but to the liberty of the house; prisoners still, though within larger walls; and then all our life is but a going out to the place of execution, to death.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Eighty Sermons, sermon 27 (1640).
(9) (2)
I throw myself down in my chamber, and I call in, and invite God, and his Angels thither, and when they are there, I neglect God and his Angels, for the noise of a fly, for the rattling of a coach, for the whining of a door.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Preached December 12, 1626. Eighty Sermons, no. 80, sct. 3 (1640).
(3) (1)
We are all conceived in close prison; in our mothers' wombs, we are close prisoners all; when we are born, we are born but to the liberty of the house; prisoners still, though within larger walls; and then all our life is but a going out to the place of execution, to death.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Eighty Sermons, no. 27 (published 1640).
(3) (1)
He must pull out his own eyes, and see no creature, before he can say, he sees no God; He must be no man, and quench his reasonable soul, before he can say to himself, there is no God.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Eighty Sermons, ser. 23 (1640).
(1) (1)
Though she were true, when you met her, And last, till you write your letter, Yet she Will be False, ere I come, to two, or three.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Go and catch a falling star (l. 23-27). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
(3) (1)
Who sees God's face, that is self life, must die; What a death were it then to see God die! It made his own lieutenant, Nature, shrink; It made his footstool crack, and the sun wink.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Good Friday 1613, Riding Westward (l. 17-20). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
(3) (3)
Take me to you, imprison me, for I, Except you enthrall me, never shall be free, Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Holy Sonnets, no. 14 (1633). Last lines of sonnet.
(4) (1)
We thinke that Paradise and Calvarie, Christs Crosse, and Adams tree, stood in one place; Looke, Lord, and finde both Adams met in me; As the first Adams sweat surrounds my face, May the last Adams blood my soule embrace.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Hymne to God My God, In My Sicknesse (l. 21-25). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
(4) (2)
I am a little world made cunningly Of elements, and an angelic sprite; But black sin hath betrayed to endless night My world's both parts, and Oh! both parts must die.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. I am a little world (Holy Sonnets) (l. 21-25). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
(2) (1)