John Donne Quotes

O God, oh! of thine only worthy blood, And my tears, make a heavenly Lethean flood, And drown in it my sins' black memory. That thou remember them, some claim as debt; I think it mercy, if thou wilt forget.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. If poisonous minerals (Holy Sonnets) (l. 10-14). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Loves riddles are, that though thy heart depart, It stayes at home, and thou with losing savest it: But wee will have a way more liberall, Then changing hearts, to joyne them, so wee shall Be one, and one anothers All.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Lovers' Infiniteness (l. 29-33). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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That loving wretch that swears 'Tis not the bodies marry, but the minds, Which he in her angelic finds, Would swear as justly that he hears, In that day's rude hoarse minstrelsy, the spheres. Hope not for mind in women; at their best Sweetness and wit, they're but Mummy, possessed.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Love's Alchemy (l. 18-24). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Rebel and atheist too, why murmur I, As though I felt the worst that love could do? Love may make me leave loving, or might try A deeper plague, to make her love me too; Which, since she loves before, I'm loth to see. Falsehood is worse than hate; and that must be, If she whom I love, should love me.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Love's Deity (l. 22-28). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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I long to talk with some old lover's ghost Who died before the god of love was born. I cannot think that he who then loved most, Sunk so low as to love one which did scorn.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Love's Deity (l. 1-4). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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And yet no greater, but more eminent, Love by the spring is grown; As, in the firmament, Stars by the sun are not enlarged, but shown, Gentle love deeds, as blossoms on a bough, From love's awakened root do bud out now.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Love's Growth (l. 15-20). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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The straight Hellespont between The Sestos and Abydos of her breasts.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Love's Progress, Elegies (1633). In classical mythology, Sestos and Abydos lay on either side of the Hellespont (the Dardanelles), and were the homes of the doomed lovers Hero and Leander.
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Affliction is a treasure, and scarce any man hath enough of it.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. "Meditation 17," Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions (1624).
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When one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Meditation 17, Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions (1624).
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Oh, to vex me, contraries meet in one: Inconstancy unnaturally hath begot A constant habit; that when I would not I change in vows, and in devotion. As humorous is my contrition As my profane Love, and as soon forgot: As ridlingly distempered, cold and hot,
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Oh, to vex me (Holy Sonnets) (l. 1-7). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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