John Donne Quotes

Sweetest love, I do not go For weariness of thee, Nor in hope the world can show A fitter love for me; But since that I Must die at last, 'tis best To use myself in jest Thus by feigned deaths to die.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Sweetest love, I do not go (l. 1-8). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Two graves must hide thine and my corse; If one might, death were no divorce.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Anniversary (l. 11-12). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Let us love nobly, and live, and add again Years and years unto years, till we attain To write threescore: this is the second of our reign.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). The Anniversary, Songs and Sonnets (1633). Closing lines.
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All other things to their destruction draw, Only our love hath no decay; This no tomorrow hath, nor yesterday,
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Anniversary (l. 6-8). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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When by thy scorn, O murderess, I am dead, And that thou think'st thee free From all solicitation from me, Then shall my ghost come to thy bed,
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Apparition (l. 1-4). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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No spring, nor summer beauty hath such grace, As I have seen in one autumnal face. Young beauties force our love, and that's a rape,
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Autumnal. . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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No spring, nor summer beauty hath such grace, As I have seen in one autumnal face.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). The Autumnal, Elegies (1633).
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Come live with me, and be my love, And we will some new pleasures prove Of golden sands, and crystal brooks, With silken lines, and silver hooks.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Bait. . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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For thee, thou need'st no such deceit, For, thou thyself art thine own bait; That fish, that is not catch'd thereby, Alas, is wiser far than I.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Bait (l. 25-28). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Various content To your eyes, ears, and tongue, and every part. If then your body go, what need you a heart?
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Blossom (l. 22-24). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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