John Donne Quotes

Well, then, stay here; but know, When thou hast stayed and done thy most, A naked thinking heart that makes no show Is to a woman but a kind of ghost. How shall she know my heart; or, having none, Know thee for one? Practice may make her know some other part, But take my word, she doth not know a heart.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Blossom (l. 25-32). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Call us what you will, we are made such by love; Call her one, me another fly, We're tapers too, and at our own cost die, And we in us find the eagle and the dove The phoenix riddle hath more wit By us; we two being one are it. So to one neutral thing both sexes fit, We die and rise the same, and prove Mysterious by this love.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Canonization (l. 19-27). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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My dream thou brok'st not, but continued'st it. Thou art so true that thoughts of thee suffice To make dreams truths and fables histories; Enter these arms, for since thou thought'st it best Not to dream all my dream, let's act the rest.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Dream (l. 6-10). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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But oh alas, so long, so far Our bodies why do we forbear? They are ours, though they are not we; we are The intelligences, they the sphere.
John Donne (1572-1631), British peot. The Ecstasy (l. 49-52). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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And whilst our souls negotiate there, We like sepulchral statues lay; All day, the same our postures were, And we said nothing, all the day.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Ecstasy (l. 17-20). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Love's mysteries in souls do grow, But yet the body is his book. And if some lover, such as we, Have heard this dialogue of one, Let him still mark us, he shall see Small change, when we're to bodies gone."
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Ecstasy (l. 71-76). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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So must pure lovers' souls descend T'affections, and to faculties, Which sense may reach and apprehend, Else a great Prince in prison lies.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). The Ecstasy, Songs and Sonnets (1633).
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Go; and if that word have not quite killed thee, Ease me with death by bidding me got too. Oh, if it have, let my word work on me, And a just office on a murderer do. Except it be too late to kill me so, Being double dead: going, and bidding go.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Expiration (l. 7-12). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Love was as subtly catched, as a disease; But being got it is a treasure sweet, Which to defend is harder than to get: And ought not be prophaned on either part, For though 'tis got by chance, 'tis kept by art.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. The Expostulation, last lines.
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Love was as subtly catched, as a disease; But being got it is a treasure sweet, Which to defend is harder than to get: And ought not be profaned on either part, For though 'tis got by chance,'tis kept by art.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). The Expostulation, Elegies (1633). Last lines of poem.
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