John Donne Quotes

Busy old fool, unruly sun, Why dost thou thus Through windows, and through curtains call on us?
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Sun Rising (l. 1-3). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Love, all alike, no season knows, nor clime, Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). The Sun Rising, Songs and Sonnets (1633).
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Thine age asks ease, and since thy duties be To warm the world, that's done in warming us. Shine here to us, and thou art everywhere; This bed thy center is, these walls, thy sphere.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. The Sun Rising (l. 27-30). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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I am two fools, I know, For loving, and for saying so In whining poetry.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). The Triple Fool, Songs and Sonnets (1633).
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This is my playes last scene, here heavens appoint My pilgrimages last mile; and my race Idly, yet quickly runne, hath this last pace, My spans last inch, my minutes last point, And gluttonous death, will instantly unjoynt My body, and soule, and I shall sleepe a space,
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. This is my playes last scene (Holy Sonnets) (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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Thou hast made me, and shall thy work decay? Repair me now, for now mine end doth haste; I run to death, and death meets me as fast, And all my pleasures are like yesterday.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Thou hast made me (Holy Sonnets) (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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But our old subtle foe so tempteth me That not one hour I can myself sustain. Thy grace may wing me to prevent his art, And thou like adamant draw mine iron heart.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. Thou hast made me (Holy Sonnets) (l. 11-14). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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License my roving hands, and let them go Before, behind, between, above, below.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. "To His Mistress Going to Bed," Elegies.
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Full nakedness! All joys are due to thee, As souls unbodied, bodies unclothed must be, To taste whole joys.
John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). To His Mistress Going to Bed, Elegies (composed 1590-1600, published 1669).
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So all were lost, which in the ship were found, They in the sea being burnt, they in the burnt ship drown'd.
John Donne (1572-1631), British poet. A Burnt Ship (l. 5-6). . . The Complete English Poems [John Donne]. A. J. Smith, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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