John Greenleaf Whittier Quotes

Yet here at least an earnest sense Of human right and weal is shown; A hate of tyranny intense, And hearty in its vehemence, As if my brother's pain and sorrow were my own. O Freedom! if to me belong Nor mighty Milton's gift divine, Nor Marvell's wit and graceful song. Still with a love as deep and strong As theirs, I lay, like them, my best gifts on thy shrine!
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. I love the old melodious lays (l. 26-35). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
(4) (2)
'I'm sorry that I spelt the word: I hate to go above you, Because'Mthe brown eyes lower fell— 'Because, you see, I love you!' Still memory to a grey-haired man That sweet child-face is showing. Dear girl! the grasses on her grave Have forty years been growing.
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. In School-Days (l. 33-40). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
(4) (2)
For near her stood the little boy Her childish favour singled: His cap pulled low upon a face Where pride and shame were mingled.
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. In School-Days (l. 21-24). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
(8) (1)
They tell me, Lucy, thou art dead, That all of thee we loved and cherished Has with thy summer roses perished; And left, as its young beauty fled, An ashen memory in its stead.
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Lucy Hooper.
(7) (2)
Maud Muller looked and sighed: "Ah me! That I the Judge's bride might be! "He would dress me up in silks so fine, And praise and toast me at his wine. "My father should wear a broadcloth coat, My brother should sail a painted boat.
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Maud Muller (l. 35-40). . . One Hundred and One Famous Poems. Roy J. Cook, comp. (Rev. ed., 1958) Reilly & Lee Company; reprinted 1981 by Contemporary Books.
(6) (2)
"Would she were mine, and I to-day, Like her, a harvester of hay;
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Maud Muller (l. 51-52). . . One Hundred and One Famous Poems. Roy J. Cook, comp. (Rev. ed., 1958) Reilly & Lee Company; reprinted 1981 by Contemporary Books.
(4) (3)
But he thought of his sisters, proud and cold, And his mother, vain of her rank and gold.
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Maud Muller (l. 57-58). . . One Hundred and One Famous Poems. Roy J. Cook, comp. (Rev. ed., 1958) Reilly & Lee Company; reprinted 1981 by Contemporary Books.
(7) (2)
For of all sad words of tongue or pen, The saddest are these: "It might have been!"
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. repr. In The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier, ed. W. Garrett Horder (1911). Maud Muller, l. 105-6 (1856).
(38) (3)
God pity them both! and pity us all, Who vainly the dreams of youth recall. For of all sad words of tongue or pen, The saddest are these: "It might have been!"
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Maud Muller (l. 103-106). . . One Hundred and One Famous Poems. Roy J. Cook, comp. (Rev. ed., 1958) Reilly & Lee Company; reprinted 1981 by Contemporary Books.
(17) (2)
Then she took up her burden of life again Saying only, "It might have been."
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Maud Muller (l. 57-58). . . One Hundred and One Famous Poems. Roy J. Cook, comp. (Rev. ed., 1958) Reilly & Lee Company; reprinted 1981 by Contemporary Books.
(6) (1)