John Greenleaf Whittier Quotes

For, eschewing books and tasks, Nature answers all he asks; Hand in hand with her he walks; Face to face with her he talks, Part and parcel of her joy,— Blessings on the barefoot boy!
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. The Barefoot Boy (l. 40-45). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
(4) (0)
All too soon these feet must hide In the prison cells of pride, Lose the freedom of the sod, Like a colt's for work be shod,
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. The Barefoot Boy (l. 91-94). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
(4) (0)
Of all that Orient lands can vaunt, Of marvels with our own competing, The strangest is the Haschish plant, And what will follow on its eating.
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. The Haschish, st. 1.
(3) (0)
Here Greek and Roman find themselves Alive along these crowded shelves; And Shakespeare treads again his stage, And Chaucer paints anew his age.
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. The Library, st. 7.
(2) (0)
On leaf of palm, on sedge-wrought roll; On plastic clay and leathern scroll, Man wrote his thoughts; the ages passed, And lo! the Press was found at last!
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. The Library, st. 4.
(1) (2)
The dreariest spot in all the land To Death they set apart; With scanty grace from Nature's hand, And none from that of Art.
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. The Old Burying-Ground.
(1) (2)