John Keats Quotes

There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Jan. 13-19, 1818, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 37, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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With a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, December 21, 1817, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 32, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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Poetry should surprise by a fine excess and not by singularity—it should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 27, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 51, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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Poetry should be great and unobtrusive, a thing which enters into one's soul, and does not startle it or amaze it with itself, but with its subject.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, February 3, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 44, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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I will give you a definition of a proud man: he is a man who has neither vanity nor wisdom—one filled with hatreds cannot be vain, neither can he be wise.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, August 23, 1819. Letters of John Keats, no. 144, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Keats condoned his own pride in the same letter: "This pride and egotism will enable me to write finer things than anything else could—so I will indulge it."
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My imagination is a monastery and I am its monk.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 16, 1820, to Percy Bysshe Shelley. Letters of John Keats, no. 227, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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My passions are all asleep from my having slumbered till nearly eleven and weakened the animal fibre all over me to a delightful sensation about three degrees on this sight of faintness—if I had teeth of pearl and the breath of lilies I should call it langour—but as I am I must call it laziness. In this state of effeminacy the fibres of the brain are relaxed in common with the rest of the body, and to such a happy degree that pleasure has no show of enticement and pain no unbearable frown. Neither poetry, nor ambition, nor love have any alertness of countenance as they pass by me.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, February 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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There is an electric fire in human nature tending to purify—so that among these human creatures there is continually some birth of new heroism. The pity is that we must wonder at it, as we should at finding a pearl in rubbish.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, February 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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For the sake of a few fine imaginative or domestic passages, are we to be bullied into a certain philosophy engendered in the whims of an egotist?
John Keats (1705-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 3, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 44, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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Health is my expected heaven.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, March 1, 1820, to his fiancée Fanny Brawne. Letters of John Keats, no. 194, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Keats died of tuberculosis.
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