John Keats Quotes

When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode on a Grecian Urn (l. 46-50). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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More happy love! more happy, happy love! For ever warm and still to be enjoyed, For ever panting, and for ever young; All breathing human passion far above, That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloyed, A burning forehead, and a parching tongue.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode on a Grecian Urn (l. 25-30). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Not to the sensual ear, but, more endeared, Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone:
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode on a Grecian Urn (l. 9-12). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode on a Grecian Urn, st. 2, Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of St. Agnes and Other Poems (1820).
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Ripe was the drowsy hour; The blissful cloud of summer-indolence Benumb'd my eyes;
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode on Indolence (l. 16-17). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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Ay, in the very temple of Delight Veil'd Melancholy has her sovran shrine,
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode on Melancholy (l. 25-26). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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No, no, go not to Lethe, neither twist Wolf's-bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine;
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode on Melancholy (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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Was it a vision, or a waking dream? Fled is that music:MDo I wake or sleep?
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode to a Nightingale (l. 79-80). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk:
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode to a Nightingale (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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Here, where men sit and hear each other groan; Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs, Where youth grows pale, and specter-thin, and dies; Where but to think is to be full of sorrow And leaden-eyed despairs, Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous-eyes, Or new Love pine at them beyond tomorrow.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Ode to a Nightingale (l. 24-30). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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