John Keats Quotes

After dark vapours have oppress'd our plains For a long dreary season, comes a day Born of the gentle South, and clears away From the sick heavens all unseemly stains
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. After Dark Vapours (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they weave A paradise for a sect.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. The Fall of Hyperion, cto. 1 (written 1819). Opening lines.
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He ran away to Scotland The people for to see— There he found That the ground Was as hard That a yard Was as long,
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. A Song About Myself (l. 94-100). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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Four seasons fill the measure of the year; There are four seasons in the mind of man:
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. The Human Seasons (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores,
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art! (L. 5-6). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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You speak of Lord Byron and me—there is this great difference between us. He describes what he sees—I describe what I imagine. Mine is the hardest task.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Sept. 17-27, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law George and Georgiana Keats. The Letters of John Keats, no. 156, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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Wide sea, that one continuous murmur breeds Along the pebbled shore of memory!
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. "Endymion," bk. 2.
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That thou wouldst wish thine own heart dry of blood So in my veins red life might stream again,
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. This Living Hand, Now Warm and Capable (l. 5-6). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature imagination of a man is healthy; but there is a space of life between, in which the soul is in a ferment, the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick-sighted: thence proceeds mawkishness.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Endymion, preface (1818).
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Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. To Autumn, st. 1 (1820).
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