John Keats Quotes

For I am brimfull of the friendliness That in a little cottage I have found;
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Keen, Fitful Gusts (l. 9-10). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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I saw pale kings, and princes too, Pale warriors, death pale were they all; They cried—"La belle dame sans merci Hath thee in thrall!"
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. La Belle Dame sans Merci (l. 37-40). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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The sedge has wither'd from the lake, And no birds sing.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. La Belle Dame sans Merci (l. 3-4). . . The Complete Poems [John Keats]. John Barnard, ed. (3d ed., 1988) Penguin.
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Do not all charms fly At the mere touch of cold philosophy? There was an awful rainbow once in heaven: We know her woof, her texture; she is given In the dull catalogue of common things. Philosophy will clip an angel's wings, Conquer all mysteries by rule and line, Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine Unweave a rainbow.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Lamia, pt. 2, l. 229-37, Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of St. Agnes and Other Poems (1820).
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We hate poetry that has a palpable design upon us—and if we do not agree, seems to put its hand in its breeches pocket. Poetry should be great and unobtrusive, a thing which enters into one's soul, and does not startle it or amaze it with itself, but with its subject.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 3, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 44, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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Call the world if you please "the vale of soul-making." Then you will find out the use of the world.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, written Feb. 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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The roaring of the wind is my wife and the stars through the window pane are my children. The mighty abstract idea I have of beauty in all things stifles the more divided and minute domestic happiness.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Oct. 14-31, 1818, to his brother and sister-in-law. Letters of John Keats, no. 94, ed. Frederick Page (1954). George and Georgiana Keats, married in June of that year and recently settled in the United States, had urged the poet to think of starting a family.
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I always made an awkward bow.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Nov. 30, 1820. Letters of John Keats, no. 242, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Last words of the last letter sent by Keats, following his remark, "I can scarcely bid you goodbye, even in a letter." Two weeks earlier, desperately ill with tuberculosis, the poet had arrived in Rome, where he was to die Feb. 23, 1821.
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If you still behave in dancing rooms and other societies as I have seen you—I do not want to live—if you have done so I wish this coming night may be my last. I cannot live without you, and not only you but chaste you; virtuous you.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, May/June 1820, to Fanny Brawne. Letters of John Keats, no. 220, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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The opinion I have of the generality of women—who appear to me as children to whom I would rather give a sugar plum than my time, forms a barrier against matrimony which I rejoice in.
John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Oct. 14-31, 1818, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 94, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Two years later (Aug. 1820) Keats wrote, "I am certain that I have said nothing in a spirit to displease any woman I would care to please; but still there is a tendency to class women in my books with roses and sweetmeats."
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