John Milton Quotes

Descend from Heav'n Urania, by that name If rightly thou art call'd, whose Voice divine Following, above th' Olympian Hill I soare, Above the flight of Pegasean wing. The meaning, not the Name I call: for thou Nor of the Muses nine, nor on the top Of old Olympus dwell'st, but Heav'nlie borne, Before the Hills appeerd, or Fountain flow'd, Thou with Eternal wisdom didst converse, Wisdom thy Sister, and with her didst play In presence of th' Almightie Father, pleas'd With thy Celestial Song.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. VII, l. 1-12). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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How charming is divine philosophy! Not harsh and crabbèd, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectared sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Second brother, in Comus, l. 476-80 (1637).
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Others apart sat on a Hill retir'd, In thoughts more elevate, and reason'd high Of Providence, Foreknowledge, Will, and Fate, Fixt Fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute, And found no end, in wandring mazes lost. Of good and evil much they argu'd then, Of happiness and final misery, Passion and Apathie, and glory and shame, Vain wisdom all, and false Philosophie:
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. II, l. 557-565). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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To be blind is not miserable; not to be able to bear blindness, that is miserable.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Second Defence (1654). Milton's sight was impaired from 1644, his blindness becoming complete in the winter of 1651-1652.
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the Fiend Saw undelighted all delight, all kind Of living creatures, new to sight and strange: Two of far nobler shape, erect and tall, God-like erect, with native honour clad In naked majesty, seemed lords of all, And worthy seemed; for in their looks divine The image of their glorious Maker shone,
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IV, l. 285-292). OBS. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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Now the bright morning star, day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her The flow'ry May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip and the pale primrose. Hail, bounteous May, that dost inspire Mirth and youth and warm desire! Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Milton's Poetical Works, ed. Douglas Bush (1966). Song: On May Morning (c. 1630).
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A happy rural seat of various view: Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm; Others whose fruit, burnished with golden rind, Hung amiable—Hesperian fables true. If true, here only—and of delicious taste. Betwixt them lawns, or level downs, and flocks Gracing the tender herb, were interposed, Or palmy hillock; or the flowery lap Of some irriguous valley spread her store, Flowers of all hue, and without thorn the rose. Another side, umbrageous grots and caves Of cool recess, o'er which the mantling vine Lays forth her purple grape, and gently creeps Luxuriant: meanwhile murmuring waters fall Down the slope hills, dispersed, or in a lake, That to the fringed bank with myrtle crowned Her crystal mirror holds, unite their streams.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IV, l. 247-263). OBS. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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Hail, bounteous May, that does inspire Mirth and youth and warm desire! Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing. Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and wish thee long.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Song on May Morning (l. 5-10). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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The birds their quire apply; airs, vernal airs, Breathing the smell of field and grove, attune The trembling leaves, while universal Pan, Knit with the Graces and the Hours in dance, Led on th' eternal Spring.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IV, l. 264-268). OBS. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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They also serve who only stand and wait.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Sonnet 19, "On His Blindness," (written c. 1652, published 1673). "Patience" is the speaker. Sonnet also called "When I Consider How My Light is Spent" [1st line of sonnet]....
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