John Milton Quotes

Mee of these Nor skilld nor studious, higher Argument Remaines, sufficient of it self to raise That name, unless an age too late, or cold Climat, or Years damp my intended wing Deprest, and much they may, if all be mine, Not Hers who brings it nightly to my Ear.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IX, l. 41-47). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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When I consider how my light is spent, Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide, And that one talent which is death to hide Lodged with me useless.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Sonnet 19, "On His Blindness," l. 1-4 (written c. 1652, published 1673). Milton became completely blind in the winter of 1651-1652. Poem is also called "When I Consider How My Light is Spent."
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God from the mount of Sinai, whose grey top Shall tremble, he descending, will himself In thunder lightning and loud trumpets' sound Ordain them laws; part such as appertain To civil justice, part religious rites Of sacrifice, informing them, by types And shadows, of that destined seed to bruise The serpent, by what means he shall achieve Mankind's deliverance.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. XII, l. 227-235). FaBoPV. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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How soon hath Time, the subtle thief of youth, Stolen on his wing my three-and-twentieth year!
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Sonnet 7, On His Having Arrived at the Age of Twenty-three (written 1632, published 1645). Also called "How Soon Hath Time."
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"Awake, My fairest, my espoused, my latest found, Heaven's last best gift, my ever new delight, Awake, the morning shines, and the fresh field Calls us: we lose the prime, to mark how spring Our tended plants, how blows the citron grove, What drops the myrrh and what the balmy reed, How nature paints her colors, how the bee Sits on the bloom extracting liquid sweet."
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. V, l. 17-25). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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Freely we serve, Because we freely love, as in our will To love or not; in this we stand or fall.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Paradise Lost, ed. Scott Elledge (1993). the angel Raphael, in Paradise Lost, bk. 5, l. 538-40 (1674). Addressing Adam.
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She fair, divinely fair, fit love for Gods, Not terrible, though terror be in love, And beauty, not approached by stronger hate, Hate stronger under show of love well feigned— The way which to her ruin now I tend."
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IX, l. 489-493). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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From man or angel the great Architect Did wisely to conceal, and not divulge His secrets to be scanned by them who ought Rather admire; or if they list to try Conjecture, he his fabric of the heav'ns Hath left to their disputes, perhaps to move His laughter at their quaint opinions wide Hereafter, when they come to model heav'n And calculate the stars, how they will wield The mighty frame, how build, unbuild, contrive To save appearances, how gird the sphere With centric and eccentric scribbled o'er, Cycle and epicycle, orb in orb.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. the angel Raphael, in Paradise Lost, bk. 8, l. 72-84 (1667).
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What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable Will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield: And what is else not to be overcome?
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. I, l. 105-109). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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They eat, they drink, and in communion sweet Quaff immortality and joy.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. the angel Raphael, in Paradise Lost, bk. 5 (1667). Sharing "the choicest fruits of paradise" with Adam and Eve.
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