John Milton Quotes

If answerable style I can obtaine Of my Celestial Patroness, who deignes Her nightly visitation unimplor'd, And dictates to me slumbring, or inspires Easie my unpremeditated Verse:
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IX, l. 20-24). FM. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
(1) (0)
These two Imparadised in one another's arms, The happier Eden, shall enjoy their fill Of bliss on bliss.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. the devil, in Paradise Lost, bk. 4, l. 505-8 (1667). Referring to Adam and Eve.
(2) (0)
Thy hatred for this misery befallen; On me already lost, me than thyself More miserable. Both have sinned, but thou Against God only; I against God and thee, And to the place of judgment will return, There with my cries importune Heaven, that all The sentence, from thy head removed, may light On me, sole cause to thee of all this woe, Me, me only, just object of his ire."
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. X, l. 928-936). TOF. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
(1) (0)
Let not England forget her precedence of teaching nations how to live.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, "To the Parliament of England," (1643).
(7) (5)
With thee conversing I forget all time, All seasons and their change, all please alike. Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistring with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild, then silent night With this her solemn bird and this fair moon, And these the gems of heav'n, her starry train: But neither breath of morn when she ascends With charm of earliest birds, nor rising sun On this delightful land,
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IV, l. 639-652). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
(1) (0)
Truth ... never comes into the world but like a Bastard, to the ignominy of him that brought her forth.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, introduction (1643).
(6) (2)
Thus the orb he roamed With narrow search, and with inspection deep Considered every creature, which of all Most opportune might serve his wiles, and found The serpent subtlest beast of all the field.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost, bk. 9, l. 82-6 (1674). Referring to Satan, searching for a place "where to lie hid."
(1) (0)
'Tis chastity, my brother, chastity. She that has that is clad in complete steel, And like a quivered nymph with arrows keen May trace huge forests and unharbored heaths, Infamous hills and sandy perilous wilds, Where, through the sacred rays of chastity, No savage fierce, bandit, or mountaineer Will dare to soil her virgin purity.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. The elder brother, in Comus, l. 420-7 (1637).
(1) (0)
Nor aught availed him now To have built in heav'n high tow'rs; nor did he scape By all his engines, but was headlong sent With his industrious crew to build in hell.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost, bk. 1, l. 748-51 (1667). Referring to the architect Mulciber, who had built Pandemonium, "the high capital/Of Satan and his peers" (l. 756-7).
(1) (0)