John Milton Quotes

So he with difficulty and labour hard Moved on, with difficulty and labour he; But he once passed, soon after when man fell, Strange alteration! Sin and Death amain Following his track, such was the will of Heaven, Paved after him a broad and beaten way Over the dark abyss, whose boiling gulf Tamely endured a bridge of wondrous length From hell continued reaching th' utmost orb Of this frail world;
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. II, l. 1021-1030). SeCePo. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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Hail holy Light, of spring of Heav'n first-born, Or of th' Eternal Coeternal beam May I express thee unblam'd? since God is Light, And never but in unapproached Light Dwelt from Eternitie, dwelt then in thee, Bright effluence of bright essence in create. Or hear'st thou rather pure Ethereal stream, Whose Fountain who shall tell?
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. III, l. 1-8). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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So saying, her rash hand in evil hour Forth-reaching to the Fruit, she plucked, she eat. Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat, Sighing through all her works, gave signs of woe That all was lost.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IX, l. 780-784). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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In darkness, and with dangers compast round, And solitude; yet not alone, while thou Visit'st my slumbers Nightly, or when Morn Purples the East: still govern thou my Song, Urania, and fit audience find, though few.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. VII, l. 27-31). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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Let none admire That riches grow in hell; that soil may best Deserve the precious bane.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost, bk. 1, l. 690-3 (1667).
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So spake our Father penitent; nor Eve Felt less remorse. They, forthwith to the place Repairing where he judged them, prostrate fell Before him reverent, and both confessed Humbly their faults, and pardon begged, with tears Watering the ground, and with their sighs the air Frequenting, sent from hearts contrite, in sign Of sorrow unfeigned and humiliation meek.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. X, l. 1097-1104). NAWM-1. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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How gladly would I meet, Mortality, my sentence, and be earth Insensible! how glad would lay me down, As in my mother's lap! There I should rest, And sleep secure.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Adam, in Paradise Lost, bk. 10.
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Them she upstays Gently with myrtle band, mindless the while Herself, though fairest unsupported flower, From her best prop so far, and storm so nigh.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IX, l. 430-433). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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What thou art is mine; Our state cannot be severed, we are one, One flesh; to lose thee were to lose myself.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Paradise Lost, ed. Scott Elledge (1993). Adam, in Paradise Lost, bk. 9, l. 957-9 (1674). Addressing Eve, after she has confessed her sin.
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"What may this mean? Language of Man pronounced By tongue of brute, and human sense expressed! The first at least of these I thought denied To beasts, whom God on their creation-day Created mute to all articulate sound; The latter I demur, for in their looks Much reason, and in their actions, oft appears.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IX, l. 553-559). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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